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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

In many places, if a marriage ends due to an affair, the innocent spouse may be left with anger and hurt feelings, but will otherwise have no recourse. That is not the case here in North Carolina, one of the few remaining states to recognize the right of an innocent spouse to bring claims for alienation of affection or criminal conversation. Though the cases are relatively rare, they still occur each and every year, with some, like a recent case out of Winston-Salem, grabbing headlines.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

When it comes to custody issues during and after a divorce, it can be very hard for families to navigate the complexities of two parents, two homes and multiple opposing ideas of what is right. One of the most difficult custody issues to resolve is when one parent decides to relocate out-of-state, something that forces a court to upend the previously agreed to parenting plan.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

No, we are not talking about trust, the bond of confidence between two people, we are instead talking about something a lot more tangible; trust funds, the popular estate planning vehicle used by more and more families every year. The dissolution of a marriage can impact nearly every aspect of your estate plan, including trusts. To understand more about what divorce might mean for your trust fund and how trust funds can prove helpful in the event of a split, keep reading.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What happens when a person’s income is not guaranteed and fluctuates from year to year”.

When you are dealing with a divorce, it can be hard to feel like you are ever fully prepared. Given the complexities of the divorce process and the emotional issues involved, few people can honestly say they’re equipped to face every challenge that comes along. That is why it is so easy for things to fall through the cracks, especially issues that you did not even know to look out for. One example of an important problem to be aware of concerns tax trouble related to the divorce. To learn more about how to avoid creating tax issues for yourself, keep reading.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

What factors lead to divorce? It could be problems communicating, a lack of money, an abundance of money, disagreements about children, about in-laws, about chores, about infidelity. Working too much or too little is also a common issue in the demise of a relationship. There are too many to name and each divorce involves factors unique to that marriage. That said, it appears that what a person does for a living might be one (of a multitude) of things that can make it more or less likely that he or she eventually divorces.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is social media evidence used in divorce proceedings?”

Sometimes divorce can be a bumpy process, everyone knows that. In a divorce, especially where important issues are in contention, there can be a desire by one party or the other to hurry things up, get the process done as quickly as possible and settle the complex issues down the road. Though most people may agree with the sentiment and would relish the opportunity to move on more quickly, it’s rare to take action to try and force it to happen. A messy divorce in Kansas recently took a turn for the worse and led to an unusual request, with the wife asking the court to allow what’s known as a bifurcated divorce.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

If you have been through a divorce you understand that interaction with the legal system is a requirement. No matter how agreeable you and your ex might be, a judge will still have to be involved. Someone, maybe not you, but your attorney, will have to set foot in a courtroom. Formal papers will need to be submitted to clerks. Hearings and deadlines and other judicial-related hoops will need to be jumped through. And that’s if things are reasonably cooperative. If you and your ex are at each other’s throats the justice system can become much more invasive.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” Is there some property that the judge cannot divide?”

Though Brits and Americans diverge when it comes to their love of the Queen and tea, court cases, both criminal or civil, tend to be remarkably similar on either side of the pond. Given that the justice system in the US is based on British common law, this may not come as much of a shock. One area where the two countries have tended to agree concerns divorce, with courts in both countries going about things like division of assets in largely similar ways. A recent court ruling in London may mark the beginning of a divergence, at least as it relates to a certain segment of the population.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

Many people have skewed views of what happens in a courtroom. Television and movies have done a disservice to our understanding of what really goes in when you’re in front of a judge. We expect fireworks, tears, shocking revelations, audible gasps from the jury and if we don’t get it we’re disappointed. The reality is that in the vast (and I mean vast) majority of cases, you’re simply trying to hold people’s attention. Just as one example, discovery obligations and rules of evidence make it unlikely that surprises will occur, both sides usually see any “surprise” coming long before it’s ever presented in court.