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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

Religious conservatism is almost always associated with an emphasis on family values, especially the creation of strong and stable marriages. Churches do what they can to encourage congregants to marry wisely and then remain in those marriages until death do they part. Though religion is usually seen as a force that contributes to stable marriage, studies have come back with numbers that don’t always support such a notion. One especially famous study even showed that certain religious traditions have noticeably higher divorce rates than others.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

One of the most contentious issues in a divorce involves dividing a couple’s assets. As the process almost always reveals, people put a lot of stock in their possessions and often view the division, who gets what, as a kind of judgment of their contribution to the relationship. This is why in some cases it matters a great deal to one party whether they walk away with 45, 50 or 55 percent. Though the amount itself may not matter, the idea that their contribution has been appropriately acknowledged does.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

If you’ve ever played Farmville, then you played a part in making Mark Pincus a very rich man (a billionaire, in fact). Though his name might not ring a bell, his products likely do. Mark is the founder of a major videogame company known as Zynga, which is responsible for several big hits. His company has done quite well and Mark is now believed to be worth a little over $1.2 billion.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

People often discuss how when divorce happens, children can wind up caught in the middle. It’s true, children are sometimes used as pawns, with one parent attempting to deprive the other of time with the kids as a way of exacting revenge. Parents caught in a terrible struggle can lose sight of the best interests of the children, letting their own hurt feelings cloud their better judgment.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

When you think of Supreme Court cases, you typically imagine the big ones, cases like Brown v. Board of Education or Miranda v. Arizona. Though it’s true that the Supremes usually only involve themselves in the bigger disputes, there are times when they choose to wade into more run-of-the-mill matters. A recent case argued before the court illustrates just that and concerns principles of equitable division; more specifically, how pension payments are divided during a divorce.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s been a rough few weeks for a relatively obscure member of Mississippi’s legislature. Andy Gipson was, until earlier this month, seldom on the national news radar. That changed as the state legislature has taken steps to try and address severely antiquated laws surrounding the divorce process. Two different legislators put forward two different measures to try and reform the backwards laws and both were killed before making it to the full chamber by Gipson. His actions resulted in a swift response from critics, with reports indicating that Gipson was deluged in phone calls, emails and social media posts by those who disagreed with his tactics.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

Though no divorce is fun, some divorces can become especially nasty. In these cases, one common cause is that one party is opposed to the divorce and wants to try and hold onto the marriage, forcing the other to drag him or her kicking and screaming every step of the way. In other cases, it’s simply that the uncooperative spouse is controlling and used to getting his or her way. A divorce, especially one not on their terms, comes as a shock to the system and it can encourage sometimes horrifying displays of stubbornness.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

One of the most common complaints about divorce is that the process takes so long. Between waiting periods to file, the slow court process and uncooperative spouses, it can take months or longer for a divorce to make its way through the legal system. As a result, some states have begun to take action to speed things up. Mandatory wait times are being decreased and processes are being streamlined, especially in cases where there are no children. Though increasing speed is important in the U.S., lawmakers in other countries are desperate to slow things down.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I have to be living separately to meet with a lawyer about divorce?”

A common complaint of the divorce process is how long it can take. A runner up? How expensive it is. Though both are legitimate complaints regardless of your location, they’re perhaps especially true for residents of Mississippi. Mississippi has the dubious honor of being one of only two states that does not recognize a right to a no-fault divorce. That means that those couples in Mississippi looking to end their marriages need to prove fault and, if no fault is proven or if his or her spouse won’t cooperate, you could effectively become trapped in your marriage, driving up the time and expense associated with the process.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I delete old posts or censor new posts while going through a divorce?”

When it comes to marriage and divorce, we are used to thinking that people can do as they wish. Thankfully, the government seldom decides to play matchmaker, telling people who to marry or when to divorce. Though this is almost always an issue left up to individuals, there are some very special circumstances where courts (and possibly even state legislatures) decide to get involved, deciding on behalf of others when or if they are allowed to marry or divorce.