Articles Posted in Parenthood

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

Parental alienation is often caused by the actions of an ex-partner and, in some cases, may not even be intentional. However, it is fairly common to see various instances of what can be interpreted as alienation from your ex-partner. For instance, they might tell your kids that you do not love them anymore, or that they are no longer safe with you. There may also be more subtle actions on the part of your ex-partner, too, such as going to your child’s school or extracurricular activities without first inviting you.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

A child born during a marriage is automatically considered an heir to both parties of the marriage. However, when a child is born to unmarried parents, the father should establish paternity (the unmarried mother is legally considered the parent).

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

https://youtu.be/u7xF07u5008

As the end of the COVID-19 pandemic is nowhere in sight, parents and children are required to navigate online schooling and distance learning. Adjusting to the new reality can be difficult and stressful for all parents, especially divorced parents who share child custody.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

Not all child custody cases proceed to court. In North Carolina, divorced or separated parents have the option to work out a parenting plan among themselves. Your parenting plan should outline a detailed schedule for timesharing and set forth the parents’ responsibilities and duties.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

Hearing the word kidnapping in relation to your child can be utterly terrifying. When most people hear the term kidnapping, they probably think of a stranger abducting a child. Most people do not think of a kidnapping happening by one of the child’s own parents. They might think that a parent cannot kidnap his or her own child. However, parental kidnapping happens more frequently than one might think. In fact, parental kidnappings are not uncommon. Studies estimate that over the course of a year, 200,000 children were kidnapped by their own family members. An average of 800,000 children go missing each year. This breaks down to an average of about 2,000 children a day going missing.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Who pays for the children’s health insurance and co-pays?”

Adjusting to life with children after divorce can be difficult. Suddenly, after having spent the past years or months with a spouse sharing the responsibilities of parenthood, you are suddenly left caring for your children alone. One of the biggest changes after divorce is the family’s finances. Instead of the income of two parents supporting one household, there is now only one income. In North Carolina, child support payments are often ordered in divorce and child custody agreements to ensure that the children have the resources to be cared for, regardless of the marital status of the parents. While child support is an option, sometimes it is difficult to collect the child support owed. There are different ways that child support orders can be enforced.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Who pays for the children’s health insurance and co-pays?”

If you asked someone 20 years ago if there would ever be a possibility of a woman conceiving a baby with her spouse who is deceased, you would have likely gotten a blank stare of disbelief. 20 years ago this was not possible, but through increases in technology and conception methods, the possibility of conceiving a child after the death of a spouse is possible through In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). In the estate planning world, this type of situation, a child born after the death of one of the parents, would be called an “after born child.” There are may legal considerations that must be noted when there is the potential for an after born child.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” If I remarry, can they look at my new spouse’s income?”

You might think that determining paternity these days would be a fairly simple process. There is no longer a need for lengthy trials, witness testimony and a weighing of factors. A simple, fast, affordable genetic test can arrive at a definitive answer in record time. Though genetic testing allows for speedy resolution to the biological question of paternity, courts have, in some cases, been reluctant to let genetics dictate the answer to the legal question of paternity.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

Everyone knows that custody and visitation are among the most contentious parts of many divorces. Parents are understandably motivated to secure as much time as possible with their children and fight hard to ensure they are granted authority to make decisions about how their children will be raised. Though this makes perfect sense, many wonder if the process could be simplified (and made much less stressful) by eliminating the fight over custody entirely.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

Going through a divorce with kids can be incredibly difficult. Divorce is bad enough as it is, but the added stress of worrying how the divorce will impact your kids, the pain of creating new routines, of dividing parenting responsibilities and of creating a visitation arrangement that’s workable, is even harder. Given how difficult divorce with kids already is, it’s certainly not helpful for a judge to actively attempt to make the process even worse. This what appears to have happened recently in Kentucky, where one family court judge was recently reprimanded for treating divorced couples with children differently than those without.

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