Articles Tagged with improper behavior

Insta-Edu-Market-2Can a Child Choose Which Parent to Live With in a Divorce?

Divorcing while having children can be challenging and stressful, not just for the parents, but also for the kids. Generally, parents share legal custody of their children after divorce. Legal custody allows a parent to make important decisions on behalf of the child. When it comes to physical custody, where the child resides, one parent is typically the primary custodial parent, and the other parent has regular visitation. Parents and courts will decide where children will live after their parents’ divorce, but many wonder whether the child has the option to choose his or her preference.

Child Custody: The Best Interest of the Child

8-1What are the Most Common Divorce Mistakes?

Divorce is one of the most difficult and emotionally draining times in your life. When you say “I do,” you do not expect the marriage to end. Yet almost half of all first marriages end in divorce. The decision to divorce starts a process that can be stressful. It can be even harder if you make mistakes along the way. There are some common mistakes that you can avoid to make your divorce easier, faster, and less tense. An experienced divorce attorney will answer your questions and help you through the process.

Failure to Communicate

2-5The Engagement is Off – Do I Need to Return the Engagement Ring?

The day you get engaged is only eclipsed by your wedding day. Your engagement is the beginning of your new life together and the start of planning for the big day. The engagement ring is one of the most well-known symbols of love in our society. The engagement ring is a way to show that you are betrothed and that you are in a committed relationship. Unfortunately, if you end your engagement, the wedding will not take place. If that happens, do you need to return the engagement ring?

Gift in Contemplation of Marriage

5-1What is the Difference Between Joint and Sole Child Custody?

When parents’ divorce, they still have the responsibility of raising their children. Divorce can make parenting more challenging. Both parents are still part of their children’s lives and must still provide for them. Both parents generally have legal custody of their children. Legal custody means that you are allowed to make decisions on behalf of your child, such as those regarding education, religion, and medical needs. Parents may have joint or sole physical custody of their child.

Physical Child Custody

2-1How is Spousal Support Determined in North Carolina?

When a couple divorces, they must divide their marital property in half. Each party walks away with half of their assets. In some cases, one spouse needs money from the other for their ongoing living expenses. This money is called spousal support, maintenance, or alimony. Spousal support is not automatic. In order to obtain support, the judge must have evidence to prove that the spouse needs the money. It is helpful to understand how the courts determine spousal support in North Carolina.

Is Spousal Support Necessary?

5Asset and Property Division in North Carolina Divorce

When a couple divorces, they must review their assets, property, and debts and agree on how they will divide them. This can be a very complex undertaking, especially in marriages that lasted a long time or in a high-asset divorce. Couples need to determine all their assets and decide exactly how to distribute them in an equal and fair manner. A knowledgeable North Carolina divorce attorney will help you through the process.

Types of Property

6How Do I Prepare for a Custody Case?

When parents divorce, they often disagree about some of the fundamental settlement terms. Disputes regarding the children are among the most common arguments between divorcing couples. In North Carolina, both parents often share legal custody of their children. This is called shared parenting or co-parenting. The children typically live primarily with one parent and have regular visits with the other parent. Sometimes, parents cannot agree on child custody. When that happens, it can make the divorce process more difficult and stressful.

Child Custody

3-1Managing Your Credit Score During Divorce

You work hard for years to maintain a good credit history and score. When you are married, you and your spouse are usually responsible for the debts that you incur. Although you may always pay your bills on time and keep a good credit to debt ratio, you could face some credit challenges during and after your divorce. Even when couples agree to end their marriage, they may disagree about finances. In North Carolina, when couples divorce their marital property, including debts are to be divided equally.

Marital Debts

1-4What is a Custody Evaluation?

When couples divorce, they need to resolve many settlement issues. Some divorces are amicable, but often, couples disagree about important matters such as child custody. Parents may both have legal custody of their child, which allows both parents to make important decisions about a child’s health, education, and religion, among other things. Physical custody refers to where a child will live most of the time. Disputes about child custody can be emotional and challenging to resolve.

Resolving Custody Disputes

11How Can I Relocate with My Child After Divorce?

Parenting is often difficult after a divorce. When parents go their separate ways, they still have responsibilities to their children. Usually, both parents share legal custody of their child in that they are both able to make important decisions regarding the life of their child. Some of these decisions revolve around the child’s health, education, and religion, among others. Often, children reside primarily with one parent while they enjoy regular visitation with the other parent. The custodial parent may want to move out of the area after a divorce. Before you relocate, you need to make sure that you do so in a way that is legal.

Are There Restrictions on Relocation After Divorce?

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