Articles Tagged with Equitable Distribution

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Every divorce and family law case is different because every family is different. There are different family dynamics, marital assets, and child custody disputes. While the specific facts of each case are different, there are commonalities among many family law divorce cases. The following are the three of the major issues that commonly arise in a divorce proceedings.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I delete old posts or censor new posts while going through a divorce?”

Divorce is difficult. Suddenly, two people who have spent a portion of their lives, regardless of how long or short of a time, together are deciding to end their marriage and separate. Due to the personal nature of divorce, conflict and emotions can run high. It can be difficult to split up assets, reach a custody agreement, and come to a mutual decision on the best division of property. Each side wants what they want and will present evidence to help them get it. One type of evidence that is commonly used in divorce proceedings that you might not expect is social media posts. Social media can have a negative impact on your divorce. The following are some guidelines to social media to consider during divorce proceedings in North Carolina.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

The process of getting a divorce in North Carolina can be confusing. Not only are the rules complicated, but you are also likely wrestling internally with some heavy emotions and transitioning to a new chapter of your life. No two divorces are identical, but if you are considering separating from you spouse, there are some important things you must consider first.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

We have all heard the fairytales – boy meets girl, boy and girl fall in love, boy and girl get married, boy and girl live happily ever after. Life is not a fairytale, and more and more couples are choosing to postpone marriage and instead live together as if they were a married couple – sharing financial responsibility, purchasing a home together, etc. There is nothing wrong with postponing marriage, but there are some financial considerations that couples must think about to avoid problems in the future. When unmarried couples do not have defined financial plans, or responsibilities, it can often result in financial harm.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” Is there some property that the judge cannot divide?”

When couples are considering, or pursuing a divorce, there is a lot of discussion on the distribution of property between the couple. Is everything split down the middle? Is one spouse entitled to more of the assets than the other? What exactly are the property or assets that need to be divided? The assets and property that people most think of in divorce are homes, cars, and monetary assets. However, for some couples there are other types of property that must be considered. Personal injury settlements can become a contentious point in a divorce. To determine what happens to those settlements, you must first look at the way that property is classified by family law.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” Is there some property that the judge cannot divide?”

Deciding to file for divorce in North Carolina can be difficult. Not only are you dealing with the emotional ramifications that might come along with ending a marriage, but you are also faced with dividing physical property between you and your soon to be ex-spouse. Recently, the North Carolina Court of Appeals ruled on a divorce case with some issues surrounding the division of marital property.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

No, we are not talking about trust, the bond of confidence between two people, we are instead talking about something a lot more tangible; trust funds, the popular estate planning vehicle used by more and more families every year. The dissolution of a marriage can impact nearly every aspect of your estate plan, including trusts. To understand more about what divorce might mean for your trust fund and how trust funds can prove helpful in the event of a split, keep reading.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

Many people have skewed views of what happens in a courtroom. Television and movies have done a disservice to our understanding of what really goes in when you’re in front of a judge. We expect fireworks, tears, shocking revelations, audible gasps from the jury and if we don’t get it we’re disappointed. The reality is that in the vast (and I mean vast) majority of cases, you’re simply trying to hold people’s attention. Just as one example, discovery obligations and rules of evidence make it unlikely that surprises will occur, both sides usually see any “surprise” coming long before it’s ever presented in court.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

One of the most contentious issues in a divorce involves dividing a couple’s assets. As the process almost always reveals, people put a lot of stock in their possessions and often view the division, who gets what, as a kind of judgment of their contribution to the relationship. This is why in some cases it matters a great deal to one party whether they walk away with 45, 50 or 55 percent. Though the amount itself may not matter, the idea that their contribution has been appropriately acknowledged does.