Articles Tagged with Equitable Distribution

3How Do I Divorce a Spouse Who Lives in Another State?

The decision to divorce often comes after a long period of discord or discontent. In North Carolina, couples can file for a no-fault divorce based on irreconcilable differences. Couples are required to live apart for a period of at least one year before they can seek an absolute divorce in North Carolina. In some cases, one or both parties may move out of the area where they originally resided. When this happens, it can complicate the divorce process. If you are seeking a divorce from a partner who lives out of state, it is helpful to seek guidance from an experienced North Carolina divorce attorney.

Residency and Jurisdiction

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

Divorce rates have been on the decline for the last decade or more. For those that end in divorce, the median length of the first marriage is about 12 years. While the divorce rate on average is going down, the divorce rate among older individuals is actually rising. Baby boomers are continuing to divorce at a higher rate than those who are younger. Baby boomers are those people who were born between 1946 and 1964. If you are ending your marriage, you may want to seek guidance from a knowledgeable divorce attorney.

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How Do We Divide Property in a North Carolina Divorce?

The decision to end your marriage is the beginning of many more choices you will need to make. You and your spouse may have accumulated many assets over the years and must determine the best way to divide them. Couples often disagree as to how to handle the division of property in a divorce, and it can be a challenging issue to resolve. An experienced divorce attorney will help guide the process and work on your behalf to try to come to a fair settlement agreement.

What is Equitable Distribution?

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

Divorce is not the answer for every problematic marriage, but when a couple is no longer able to continue with the union, it may be the best solution. When you have made the tough decision to divorce, you need to focus on the legal process of ending your marriage. There are various steps that you must follow in order to obtain a divorce in North Carolina. You must make sure that you abide by the law in order to ensure a smooth process. An experienced divorce attorney will help guide the process to make it easier and less stressful for you and your family.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

The decision to end your marriage is one that is not taken lightly. In most cases, you and your spouse have been experiencing problems for some time and have been working unsuccessfully to resolve them. When you finally decide to divorce, you likely have many questions and concerns about the process and what to expect.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What happens when a person’s income is not guaranteed and fluctuates from year to year”.

Finances are among the issues that are most often areas of contention in divorce. Couples may agree on many things, but when it comes to money, the couple might disagree. North Carolina is a state that requires equitable distribution of assets. This simply means that the property, assets, and debts the couple have accumulated during marriage are to be divided between each party in a fair and equitable manner. Going through a divorce can be stressful and you will want to ensure that you get the assets that you deserve. An experienced North Carolina divorce attorney will assist you in obtaining a fair resolution.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Although there is a degree of nobility involved in pursuing a minimalist lifestyle that attempts to obtain as little debt and unnecessary living items as possible, the reality is that for many Americans, building wealth and accumulating different types of property is a lifelong goal.  When two people decide to get married, this decision often results in the combination of wealth and assets as they forge a path together. When the relationship sours and the couple decides to explore divorce, it can call into question what each spouse’s property ownership will look like in the future.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

In North Carolina, residents take pride in their work. The money they earn in exchange for their time and skill allows them to build capital and make purchases and investments that can greatly enhance their quality of life, as well as that of their families. When couples decide to marry, joining finances allows them to build wealth on a greater scale. However, when these couples elect to file for divorce, questions about this wealth are certain to arise.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

It is not uncommon for spouses who become “legally separated” to reconcile instead of filing for divorce. Under North Carolina law, a couple must be separated for one year and a day before they can seek a divorce.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

In North Carolina, equitable distribution generally involves three main steps. The court conducts the three-step process when spouses file for divorce and cannot reach consensus on property division through negotiations.

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