Articles Tagged with Huntersville

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

When you wed you believe that you will have a happy married life. Unfortunately, that is not the case for everyone. Some couples grow apart, and when that happens, you may want to end your union. In North Carolina, there are two main types of divorce. These include divorce from bed and board, and absolute divorce. When you think of divorce, you usually consider the marriage will end, however, that is not always true. Depending on your needs and your beliefs, you may want to obtain a divorce from bed and board. It is helpful to speak to an experienced divorce attorney to ensure that you seek the proper route to end your union.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

The decision to end your marriage is one that most couples take seriously. It can take some time to work through disputes and ultimately determine that it is best to seek a divorce. For most couples, the decision is a mutual one. Sometimes, however, one spouse leaves the other behind. When that happens, you may want to obtain a divorce but are unsure of how to go about ending the union. Spousal abandonment is a circumstance that may allow you to get a divorce. To file for absolute divorce in North Carolina, a couple must be separated for a period of at least one year.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

As in other states, North Carolina allows for alimony in divorces unders some circumstances. Alimony, also called spousal support or maintenance, is money that one spouse pays to another as part of a divorce order. Alimony is not automatic and is determined on a case-by-case basis using a variety of factors. Alimony may be permanent and might be paid in regular monthly payments or in a lump sum. Post-separation alimony is money that is provided from one spouse to another on an interim basis until the divorce is final.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

Couples marry each other with the hope that the union will last forever. Unfortunately, that does not always happen. In many cases, couples grow apart and no longer wish to remain together. When spouses face irreconcilable differences, they may wish to seek a no-fault divorce. In North Carolina, there are two legal avenues that allow for separation or divorce from a spouse. Absolute divorce gives couples the opportunity to end a marriage in North Carolina. An experienced divorce attorney will answer your questions and help guide the process.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

One of the most difficult parts of a divorce is having to spend time away from your children. Divorce can make life difficult for everyone. The key to a successful transition is to resolve matters regarding parenting time so that both parents get to have regular time with their children. When you establish a new schedule, kids will often quickly adapt and will get used to their new normal. Both parents should make an attempt to come to an agreement regarding parenting time and other key decisions regarding their children. An experienced divorce attorney will help you create a parenting plan that works.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Couples often have some secrets from each other. When they divorce, spouses may find that the other person has hidden funds or has kept purchases hidden. Financial infidelity can impact a marriage and subsequently, a divorce. Couples who are divorcing often disagree about the settlement terms and most often, about finances. If your spouse is hiding assets from you it is essential that you know about it during the divorce. In North Carolina, assets that a couple accumulates during the marriage belong to both parties and must be equitably distributed. An experienced North Carolina divorce attorney will help ensure that you receive a fair and equitable settlement.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What happens when a person’s income is not guaranteed and fluctuates from year to year”.

Finances are among the issues that are most often areas of contention in divorce. Couples may agree on many things, but when it comes to money, the couple might disagree. North Carolina is a state that requires equitable distribution of assets. This simply means that the property, assets, and debts the couple have accumulated during marriage are to be divided between each party in a fair and equitable manner. Going through a divorce can be stressful and you will want to ensure that you get the assets that you deserve. An experienced North Carolina divorce attorney will assist you in obtaining a fair resolution.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

When a married couple decides to file for divorce, a divorce attorney helps the couple determine if alimony (also called “spousal support”) is an appropriate factor to consider. When a spouse remarries, it can have implications on alimony. Read on for more information.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does uncontested divorce mean?”

Although marriage can be a lifelong bond for some people, for others the bond eventually must be broken. In these situations, contacting a divorce attorney becomes necessary. Read on for what spouses in North Carolina should know about the different types of divorce options available in their state.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

Going through a divorce is decidedly one of the most stressful situations you and your family can go through. In North Carolina, couples can request a no-fault divorce. A no-fault divorce means that the couple know they are no longer compatible and the marriage has no chance of being saved. No blame is placed on either party. With any divorce, one person must initiate the process by filing a divorce complaint with the court. The party that initiates the divorce is called the complainant and the other party is the respondent.

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