Articles Tagged with parenting plan

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

When parents divorce, their main concern is usually the welfare of their children. In North Carolina, both parents should generally share custody of their children. Shared physical custody allows both parents to spend quality time with their children on a regular basis. Parents who are able to put their differences aside can provide a stable and loving environment for their children after divorce. A divorce attorney will help you establish the type of custody arrangement that will work best for your family.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

The decision to end your marriage is one that is not taken lightly. In most cases, you and your spouse have been experiencing problems for some time and have been working unsuccessfully to resolve them. When you finally decide to divorce, you likely have many questions and concerns about the process and what to expect.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

One of the most difficult parts of a divorce is having to spend time away from your children. Divorce can make life difficult for everyone. The key to a successful transition is to resolve matters regarding parenting time so that both parents get to have regular time with their children. When you establish a new schedule, kids will often quickly adapt and will get used to their new normal. Both parents should make an attempt to come to an agreement regarding parenting time and other key decisions regarding their children. An experienced divorce attorney will help you create a parenting plan that works.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

The decision to end your marriage can be a difficult one. Once you know that your marriage is over, you will need to take steps to legally end the union. In North Carolina, a divorce is also called “absolute divorce.” North Carolina allows for no-fault divorce. This means that spouses are no longer able to remain married and the marriage cannot be repaired. Divorce can be complex, especially when you have children or when you have been married a long time. It is helpful to seek guidance from a knowledgeable family law attorney to assist with the process from start to finish.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

Not all child custody cases proceed to court. In North Carolina, divorced or separated parents have the option to work out a parenting plan among themselves. Your parenting plan should outline a detailed schedule for timesharing and set forth the parents’ responsibilities and duties.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

Yes, your holidays may become a little disorderly and complicated if you are a newly divorced parent, but that does not mean that you cannot enjoy Christmas and New Year’s Eve if you share children with your ex-spouse.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

When it comes to custody issues during and after a divorce, it can be very hard for families to navigate the complexities of two parents, two homes and multiple opposing ideas of what is right. One of the most difficult custody issues to resolve is when one parent decides to relocate out-of-state, something that forces a court to upend the previously agreed to parenting plan.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

People often discuss how when divorce happens, children can wind up caught in the middle. It’s true, children are sometimes used as pawns, with one parent attempting to deprive the other of time with the kids as a way of exacting revenge. Parents caught in a terrible struggle can lose sight of the best interests of the children, letting their own hurt feelings cloud their better judgment.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

Though no divorce is fun, some divorces can become especially nasty. In these cases, one common cause is that one party is opposed to the divorce and wants to try and hold onto the marriage, forcing the other to drag him or her kicking and screaming every step of the way. In other cases, it’s simply that the uncooperative spouse is controlling and used to getting his or her way. A divorce, especially one not on their terms, comes as a shock to the system and it can encourage sometimes horrifying displays of stubbornness.

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