Articles Tagged with Custody

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

A child born during a marriage is automatically considered an heir to both parties of the marriage. However, when a child is born to unmarried parents, the father should establish paternity (the unmarried mother is legally considered the parent).

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect who gets custody?”

You have been denied child custody/visitation!” is one of the worst things a parent can hear. Losing or being denied custody is never easy, but do not panic. You may still be able to get back your custody or visitation rights in North Carolina.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

While some divorced and separated parents can agree on various issues surrounding child custody, many couples struggle with finding middle ground. When parents cannot reach a consensus regarding custody issues, they may need help from a neutral third party.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

On March 27, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper ordered North Carolinians to stay home until April 29 in an attempt to curb the spread of COVID-19. How does the state’s stay-at-home order, which prohibits residents from leaving their home except for essential activities, impact your child custody order?

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What rules are there for Father’s Right in NC?”

In the midst of a divorce, the focus is on which parent will be awarded custody of the children. What most people do not know, though, is that there are other options in a custody battle beyond the biological parents. In North Carolina, there are various statutes that can award a grandparent custody or visitation. Grandparents play a special role in a child’s life. While there may be options for grandparents to seek custody and visitation, it is by no means a guarantee that the grandparent will receive the custody or visitation. Instead, the statutes are merely a means to get into the court system to ask for visitation. The statutes do not entitle a grandparent to court ordered custody or visitation.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are not covered by child support?”

Divorce is difficult. You and your soon-to-be ex-spouse are thrust into figuring out marital assets, spousal or alimony payments, and often coming to child custody agreements. Parents want what is best for their children and tend to be sensitive to their children’s feelings and needs during a divorce. In some cases, one of the spouses might want to move out of state. In those instances, there are special considerations for the children involved, which depend on the custody arrangement and any restrictions set forth by the applicable statute.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

For years, people fought for gay couples to have the right to marry. States took action independently, slowly but consistently expanding the number of places where same-sex couples had the same rights as their opposite-sex counterparts. Then the Supreme Court weighed in a few years back and sped up the process nationally, making gay marriage legal across the U.S. Now that the right to marry is universal, at least here in the U.S., we may forget the push made by some states to reach out to gay couples, advertising themselves as gay-friendly places to get married. Some states advertised themselves in an attempt to attract lucrative tourism dollars, giving couples a chance to marry, while earning money for their state.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

Legal battles over custody and child support are miserable for everyone involved. They take time, money and create enormous amounts of stress given the importance of the subject matter: your kids. Though unpleasant, the process should at least be uniformly unpleasant, meaning that everyone suffers equally as these issues are resolved. In Chicago, an outdated court system meant that not all family law issues were handled the same way, putting some families in a better position than others. Thankfully, that two-track system has finally been abolished and all family law matters will be resolved by one unified domestic relations court.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

When it comes to custody issues during and after a divorce, it can be very hard for families to navigate the complexities of two parents, two homes and multiple opposing ideas of what is right. One of the most difficult custody issues to resolve is when one parent decides to relocate out-of-state, something that forces a court to upend the previously agreed to parenting plan.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

Everyone knows that custody and visitation are among the most contentious parts of many divorces. Parents are understandably motivated to secure as much time as possible with their children and fight hard to ensure they are granted authority to make decisions about how their children will be raised. Though this makes perfect sense, many wonder if the process could be simplified (and made much less stressful) by eliminating the fight over custody entirely.

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