Articles Tagged with Mecklenburg

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

Not every marriage ends in a lifetime of happiness with your spouse. Unfortunately, spouses have irreconcilable differences that lead them to file for divorce and legally end their marriage. For some spouses, divorce results in each spouse continuing to work and live his or her separate life, just separate from the former spouse. For others, though, a divorce can cause them to wonder how they will continue in their previous lifestyle. In some instances, one spouse works and makes money to provide for the family, while the other spouse stays home or works at a lesser paying job. A divorce does not have to devastate one, or both, spouses financially. There is a potential for one spouse to receive alimony payments from the other spouse.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Imagine this situation: You are separating from your spouse. For the duration of your marriage, you have shared the same marital home. Both of you want to stay in the home; neither of you are willing to move out, even though you have separated and initiated a divorce proceeding. What do you do in this situation? Can one spouse be forced from the marital home and leave the other with the sole possession of the home? In North Carolina, the answer to those questions are “it depends.” There are certain circumstances and situations in which a spouse can be forced out of the marital home. However, there are requirements that must be met in order to succeed.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” Is there some property that the judge cannot divide?”

Deciding to file for divorce in North Carolina can be difficult. Not only are you dealing with the emotional ramifications that might come along with ending a marriage, but you are also faced with dividing physical property between you and your soon to be ex-spouse. Recently, the North Carolina Court of Appeals ruled on a divorce case with some issues surrounding the division of marital property.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect who gets custody?”

Being hurt by the one you love is devastating, especially when it is in the form of an extra-marital affair. If your spouse has had an affair during your marriage, he or she is not the only one at fault. There is a third party that is also involved in the situation. North Carolina is one of the six states that will prosecute another person for alienation of affection. Alienation of affection is a tort action against the third party who has engaged in the affair with your spouse. Essentially, you are suing the third party for depriving you of the love and affection of your spouse.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

North Carolina courts take domestic violence acts and charges very seriously. Often times, after a defendant has been charged with a domestic violence act, he or she is required to enter into a “abuser treatment” program. This acts as a type of probation and there can be serious consequences if it is violated or ignored.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” Is there some property that the judge cannot divide?”

For most individuals facing a divorce, their concern is what will happen to the children (if any) from the marriage and how the assets of the couple will be divided and assigned. A divorce can have many consequences to the present situation of the parties involved, but there are future considerations and consequences that must be considered by the parties when entering into a divorce agreement, as well. One of these future considerations is what will happen to any retirement accounts that the couple has.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is social media evidence used in divorce proceedings?”

Going through a divorce is a major transition in life. Suddenly, your assets are being divided, custody arrangements are being set, and you are left negotiating with a soon-to-be-ex spouse over assets and issues you never thought would be the subject of a legal battle. We see divorce on television or witnesses our close friends and families go through divorce, but we do not often consider the impact that our actions might have on the outcome of a divorce.

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Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How Can I protect myself from my spouses spending habits?”

Prenuptial agreements often have a bad reputation. Marriage is “supposed” to be the union of two people who are in love and want to be married forever. When a prenuptial agreement is discussed, people often think of one spouse who is financially better off protecting his or her money in the event that the marriage ends in divorce. They think that it is a sign that the marriage will not last or be successful. This is not true. A prenuptial agreement (“prenup”) is a contract entered into before marriage that will serve as a guide in the event that a divorce happens. While people do not want to think that their marriage will end someday, it is smart to plan for all contingencies and possibilities.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

As a former mayor of New York City and attorney to the President, Rudy Giuliani is no stranger to being in the press. Recently, he has made the headlines, not for his political career or attorney work, but for a divorce to his soon to be ex-wife. His ex-wife has recently made allegations that he was having an affair during their marriage, according to the Washington Examiner.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

The act of adultery of one or both spouses is one of the biggest reasons that couples get divorced. North Carolina is a no-fault state in regards to divorce. This means that the spouse who files for divorce is not required to prove that the other spouse is at fault for the divorce. In some states, adultery is one of the “faults” that a spouse can cite as a reason for divorce. This is not true in North Carolina. Nevertheless, adultery can have an impact on a divorce. Alimony payments, child custody, and property distribution can all be affected by adultery.