Articles Tagged with common law marriage

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

We have all heard the fairytales – boy meets girl, boy and girl fall in love, boy and girl get married, boy and girl live happily ever after. Life is not a fairytale, and more and more couples are choosing to postpone marriage and instead live together as if they were a married couple – sharing financial responsibility, purchasing a home together, etc. There is nothing wrong with postponing marriage, but there are some financial considerations that couples must think about to avoid problems in the future. When unmarried couples do not have defined financial plans, or responsibilities, it can often result in financial harm.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

Unsurprisingly, marriage is seen as a nonnegotiable prerequisite to divorce. A court cannot grant a divorce and divide marital property without an underlying marriage. Though this would seem to make sense, there are instances where though a marriage may not be legally valid, it is recognized by courts as having occurred. We have previously discussed issues surrounding common law marriage, but this post deals with something a little different: the putative marriage doctrine.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I sue someone for breaking up my marriage?”

Many people have heard about common-law marriage, believing incorrectly that if you only live with a person for a certain number of years you can become legally married despite never going through the formal steps. While common-law marriage does exist, it does only under very limited circumstances and only in a small number of states. In fact, these days a variety of legal hurdles have been constructed to ensure that it is very rare for a court to acknowledge the validity of a common-law marriage.