Articles Tagged with Child Support

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How can an attorney help me with my Divorce or Separation in North Carolina?”

If you are contemplating a divorce in North Carolina, you may be considering your options to resolve your disputes with the spouse. Often, couples think that going to court is their only option to get a divorce in North Carolina. However, that is not true. There are two viable alternatives to divorce litigation — a separation agreement and consent order. But what is the difference between the two?

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How does custody work if one parent moves internationally?”

Divorce is often a complicated and adversarial process. However, things can get even more confusing when a divorce involves partners living in different states. There are many potential legal issues associated with out-of-state divorces, which is why it is best to discuss your particular case with a knowledgeable divorce attorney.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

It is never advised to disobey a legally binding and enforceable order issued by a family court in North Carolina. Refusal or failure to follow the court order may cause you to be held in contempt of court.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are covered by child support?”

In most cases, a child support obligation accounts for a large percentage of the supporting parent’s income. However, when circumstances change over time, the supporting parent may be able to petition the court to reduce their child support payments. Involuntary loss of employment or decrease in income may qualify as a “substantial change in circumstances” to lower a child support obligation in North Carolina.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How long does getting a divorce take?”

If you and your spouse decided to end your marriage, you need to understand that it might take months to get a divorce in North Carolina, and that does not even take into consideration the period of separation. In rare cases, your divorce could be resolved within a month. If there are many disputed and contested issues involved, it would take a year or longer to finalize your divorce.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How long does getting a divorce take?”

Uncontested divorces, also known as amicable divorces, tend to be less complicated than contested ones. If you and your spouse are able to resolve many or all of the issues in your divorce, your divorce is considered amicable in North Carolina.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

Apparently, the COVID-19 pandemic and its stay-at-home orders throughout the country have wreaked havoc on marriages. Or at least that is what a new analysis of court filings in Charlotte, North Carolina, shows.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How much does it cost to get divorced, and how does the billing process work?”

If you are going through a divorce in North Carolina, you are probably wondering how much the process will cost. According to a 2020 study by 24/7 Wall St., the average cost of divorce with children in North Carolina was $19,700 (or $13,100 for childless divorces).

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

The decision to get divorced is a tough one. When one spouse wants to get a divorce, that does not necessarily mean that the other spouse wants to end the marriage, too.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are covered by child support?”

For all of us, the COVID-19 pandemic came out of the blue unexpectedly. As a result, the entire nation is dealing with the economic impact of the pandemic. Skyrocketing unemployment, business closures, and government-mandated stay-at-home orders may affect obligor parents’ ability to make payments for the support of their children.

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