Articles Tagged with no fault divorce

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

The decision to end your marriage is one that is not taken lightly. In most cases, you and your spouse have been experiencing problems for some time and have been working unsuccessfully to resolve them. When you finally decide to divorce, you likely have many questions and concerns about the process and what to expect.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

Going through a divorce is decidedly one of the most stressful situations you and your family can go through. In North Carolina, couples can request a no-fault divorce. A no-fault divorce means that the couple know they are no longer compatible and the marriage has no chance of being saved. No blame is placed on either party. With any divorce, one person must initiate the process by filing a divorce complaint with the court. The party that initiates the divorce is called the complainant and the other party is the respondent.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

The decision to end your marriage can be a difficult one. Once you know that your marriage is over, you will need to take steps to legally end the union. In North Carolina, a divorce is also called “absolute divorce.” North Carolina allows for no-fault divorce. This means that spouses are no longer able to remain married and the marriage cannot be repaired. Divorce can be complex, especially when you have children or when you have been married a long time. It is helpful to seek guidance from a knowledgeable family law attorney to assist with the process from start to finish.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How long does getting a divorce take?”

Divorce is almost always tough for both spouses. However, the divorce process can become even more complicated when one spouse refuses to sign divorce papers. If the decision to end the marriage is not mutual, it may be difficult to finalize your divorce.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

Have you ever wondered why married couples are getting divorced in Charlotte, North Carolina? A new survey has revealed the “real reasons” why people in Charlotte file for divorce.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

Although couples can obtain a no-fault divorce in North Carolina, marital misconduct may play a prominent role in divorce proceedings. Specifically, any acts that constitute marital misconduct may affect such aspects of divorce as alimony and even child custody.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How can an attorney help me with my Divorce or Separation in North Carolina?”

We live in a society in which nearly 50% of all marriages end in divorce. Sometimes two people choose to end their marriage amicably after realizing that the marriage is no longer working. The couple then files for divorce and parts ways without a lot of drama. The divorce process turns much more contentious when one spouse is not cooperative or on board with the divorce proceedings. In North Carolina, you do not need the consent of your spouse to move forward with divorce proceedings. Only one person’s consent is required to file for divorce. While one person can move forward with a divorce, there are often other questions and concerns that can pop up during a divorce when only one spouse has consented.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Imagine this situation: You are separating from your spouse. For the duration of your marriage, you have shared the same marital home. Both of you want to stay in the home; neither of you are willing to move out, even though you have separated and initiated a divorce proceeding. What do you do in this situation? Can one spouse be forced from the marital home and leave the other with the sole possession of the home? In North Carolina, the answer to those questions are “it depends.” There are certain circumstances and situations in which a spouse can be forced out of the marital home. However, there are requirements that must be met in order to succeed.

How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?

Advocates for families and, specifically, victims of domestic violence are making their opinions heard in a Mississippi divorce case that will soon be decided by the state Supreme Court. Opponents of the status quo argue that Mississippi’s laws are antiquated and in desperate need of an overhaul. Of particular interest is the state’s lack of a unilateral no-fault divorce option, something that critics say traps spouses in bad relationships for years longer than necessary, holding them hostage to the whims of controlling and potentially abusive partners.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s been a rough few weeks for a relatively obscure member of Mississippi’s legislature. Andy Gipson was, until earlier this month, seldom on the national news radar. That changed as the state legislature has taken steps to try and address severely antiquated laws surrounding the divorce process. Two different legislators put forward two different measures to try and reform the backwards laws and both were killed before making it to the full chamber by Gipson. His actions resulted in a swift response from critics, with reports indicating that Gipson was deluged in phone calls, emails and social media posts by those who disagreed with his tactics.

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