Articles Tagged with Domestic violence

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

Domestic violence is a serious problem all across the country, and even the world. The more that we talk about it, the less stigmatized those who are victims and survivors feel about sharing their story. It is important to listen to survivors and not automatically assume they are lying about their experience. If you, or someone you know, is a victim of domestic violence, you are not alone. Summoning the strength to leave a toxic situation can be difficult. The following are commonly asked questions about domestic violence, or you can find additional resources regarding domestic violence here.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

Domestic violence is a serious issue across the United States. Unfortunately, abuse of a partner is all too common and individuals suffer every day because of it. Studies show that approximately 20,000 people make a call to a domestic violence hotline each year. There is not one single type of person who is likely to be an abuser or likely to be abused. However, studies have shown that  there are factors that can increase the likelihood that an abused individual will be seriously injured or even killed.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is social media evidence used in divorce proceedings?”

Domestic violence is a serious issue that plagues many, many people all over the world. When the victim of abuse finds the strength to leave a dangerous situation, it is something to applaud. Unfortunately, not everyone is able to leave an abusive situation, and the ways in which abuse can happen have only increased overtime. Domestic violence abusers have found new ways to inflict abuse on their partners. A big part of domestic violence abusers’ tactics is instilling fear into their victims. Recent technological advancements have provided more opportunities for abusers to spy on their victims and make them feel afraid.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

Every crime has a set of elements that must be met in order for an individual to be charged with that crime. While every crime is unique with its specific elements, some crimes might seem so similar that it is difficult to distinguish between them. Two of those crimes are domestic violence and civil harassment. The two may seem similar, but each has distinct characteristics. Each must be examined separately so that the elements and concepts behind each are clear and it can be determined which charge is appropriate in a given case.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I get the judge to order my spouse to pay my attorney’s fees in a property division case?”

Most of us have heard the term “domestic violence.” However, not everyone knows what it means. People often think that domestic violence is when one spouse is physically violent to another. While this can be considered domestic violence, it is not the only type of domestic violence. Since it can be confusing to define when domestic violence has occurred, it is important to know some basic legal information. The following are commonly asked questions and misconceptions surrounding domestic violence.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

In today’s society, it is not unusual to hear about domestic violence happening within marriages. As unfortunate it is to hear these stories in the media, it is important for victims to find their voice and encourage other victims to tell their stories. For victims of domestic violence, one of the hardest things to do is leave their abusive spouse. Fortunately, divorce is an option. Domestic violence is a common cause of divorce in the United States. The following are common legal questions that domestic violence victims have.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Imagine this situation: You are separating from your spouse. For the duration of your marriage, you have shared the same marital home. Both of you want to stay in the home; neither of you are willing to move out, even though you have separated and initiated a divorce proceeding. What do you do in this situation? Can one spouse be forced from the marital home and leave the other with the sole possession of the home? In North Carolina, the answer to those questions are “it depends.” There are certain circumstances and situations in which a spouse can be forced out of the marital home. However, there are requirements that must be met in order to succeed.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

North Carolina courts take domestic violence acts and charges very seriously. Often times, after a defendant has been charged with a domestic violence act, he or she is required to enter into a “abuser treatment” program. This acts as a type of probation and there can be serious consequences if it is violated or ignored.

How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?

Advocates for families and, specifically, victims of domestic violence are making their opinions heard in a Mississippi divorce case that will soon be decided by the state Supreme Court. Opponents of the status quo argue that Mississippi’s laws are antiquated and in desperate need of an overhaul. Of particular interest is the state’s lack of a unilateral no-fault divorce option, something that critics say traps spouses in bad relationships for years longer than necessary, holding them hostage to the whims of controlling and potentially abusive partners.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

It is something that very few people give much thought to: divorce behind bars. Though it seldom makes it on to most people’s radar, it can present enormous problems. Getting divorced while incarcerated is difficult if not outright impossible in some instances. This can mean that many resign themselves to being trapped in bad marriages or stuck with unresolved custody issues, which can create hopelessness among those already struggling to hold onto dreams of their future.