Articles Tagged with Domestic violence

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

In today’s society, it is not unusual to hear about domestic violence happening within marriages. As unfortunate it is to hear these stories in the media, it is important for victims to find their voice and encourage other victims to tell their stories. For victims of domestic violence, one of the hardest things to do is leave their abusive spouse. Fortunately, divorce is an option. Domestic violence is a common cause of divorce in the United States. The following are common legal questions that domestic violence victims have.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Imagine this situation: You are separating from your spouse. For the duration of your marriage, you have shared the same marital home. Both of you want to stay in the home; neither of you are willing to move out, even though you have separated and initiated a divorce proceeding. What do you do in this situation? Can one spouse be forced from the marital home and leave the other with the sole possession of the home? In North Carolina, the answer to those questions are “it depends.” There are certain circumstances and situations in which a spouse can be forced out of the marital home. However, there are requirements that must be met in order to succeed.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

North Carolina courts take domestic violence acts and charges very seriously. Often times, after a defendant has been charged with a domestic violence act, he or she is required to enter into a “abuser treatment” program. This acts as a type of probation and there can be serious consequences if it is violated or ignored.

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How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?

Advocates for families and, specifically, victims of domestic violence are making their opinions heard in a Mississippi divorce case that will soon be decided by the state Supreme Court. Opponents of the status quo argue that Mississippi’s laws are antiquated and in desperate need of an overhaul. Of particular interest is the state’s lack of a unilateral no-fault divorce option, something that critics say traps spouses in bad relationships for years longer than necessary, holding them hostage to the whims of controlling and potentially abusive partners.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

It is something that very few people give much thought to: divorce behind bars. Though it seldom makes it on to most people’s radar, it can present enormous problems. Getting divorced while incarcerated is difficult if not outright impossible in some instances. This can mean that many resign themselves to being trapped in bad marriages or stuck with unresolved custody issues, which can create hopelessness among those already struggling to hold onto dreams of their future.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

Many people have skewed views of what happens in a courtroom. Television and movies have done a disservice to our understanding of what really goes in when you’re in front of a judge. We expect fireworks, tears, shocking revelations, audible gasps from the jury and if we don’t get it we’re disappointed. The reality is that in the vast (and I mean vast) majority of cases, you’re simply trying to hold people’s attention. Just as one example, discovery obligations and rules of evidence make it unlikely that surprises will occur, both sides usually see any “surprise” coming long before it’s ever presented in court.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s been a rough few weeks for a relatively obscure member of Mississippi’s legislature. Andy Gipson was, until earlier this month, seldom on the national news radar. That changed as the state legislature has taken steps to try and address severely antiquated laws surrounding the divorce process. Two different legislators put forward two different measures to try and reform the backwards laws and both were killed before making it to the full chamber by Gipson. His actions resulted in a swift response from critics, with reports indicating that Gipson was deluged in phone calls, emails and social media posts by those who disagreed with his tactics.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

We’ve discussed pets and divorce previously and the issue is almost always handled the same way no matter where you are. Though we might consider our pets part of the family, the fact is that the law does not. In fact, in a divorce, courts across the country have long operated under the assumption that pets are no different than any other piece of property. Rather than subjecting the division of the pets to the same kind of best interest test that children enjoy, pets get allocated between the parties like a couch or some old dishes.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

The holiday season is upon us, as is the impending traditional uptick in divorce filings that comes after. Given the hot tempers that often accompany both extended amounts of family time and divorce, now may be a helpful time to answer a question frequently posed by family law clients. It often comes in the form of “What can I do to keep my soon-to-be-former spouse from doing X?”

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Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “How can an attorney help me with my Divorce or Separation in North Carolina?”

 

Congressman Alan Grayson’s war on one woman has taken an ugly turn, with Grayson’s attorney slamming his estranged wife as being a “poor housekeeper” for allowing the condition of the Florida Democrat’s 5,300 square-foot home to become “horrible.”

Alan Grayson Charlotte Mecklenburg Divorce Attorney North Carolina Family Law LawyerGrayson, the United States Representative for Florida’s 9th District, has “called out” Republican political opponents for waging a war “against all of the women in this country.” According to Grayson, the gullible, Confederate flag-waving bigots in the Grand Old Party oppose so-called “equal pay” laws and abortion, and that means they are in a war against women.

That imagined war has become all-too-real for Lolita Grayson, Rep. Grayson’s estranged wife. She claims that Rep. Grayson has failed to pay for repairs and upkeep on the Orlando home she shares with the couple’s four children. Mrs. Grayson alleges in court filings that the home’s roof is leaking, and broken windows are allowing rainwater to penetrate the interior of the home, which has led to a significant mold problem.

Rep. Grayson’s attorney calls the accusations false, saying the congressman spends more than $10,000 per month on the home’s mortgage, child support, utilities and household expenses.

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