Articles Tagged with domestic abuse

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

Domestic violence is a serious problem all across the country, and even the world. The more that we talk about it, the less stigmatized those who are victims and survivors feel about sharing their story. It is important to listen to survivors and not automatically assume they are lying about their experience. If you, or someone you know, is a victim of domestic violence, you are not alone. Summoning the strength to leave a toxic situation can be difficult. The following are commonly asked questions about domestic violence, or you can find additional resources regarding domestic violence here.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

Stressful situations can make people do unthinkable things, things that you would never expect an individual could be capable of based off of your experiences with them. During a contentious divorce, you might see a side of your former spouse come out that you never expected. There have been instances in which one spouse makes up stories about the other in an attempt to sway opinion. Lies are told in an attempt to receive more of the marital assets, receive the child custody agreement they want, or even to increase the amount of alimony received. You might think that false allegations will not affect you, but there are real consequences that come with certain allegations. If you are facing the challenge of a false allegation during divorce proceedings, here is what you need to know.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is social media evidence used in divorce proceedings?”

Domestic violence is a serious issue that plagues many, many people all over the world. When the victim of abuse finds the strength to leave a dangerous situation, it is something to applaud. Unfortunately, not everyone is able to leave an abusive situation, and the ways in which abuse can happen have only increased overtime. Domestic violence abusers have found new ways to inflict abuse on their partners. A big part of domestic violence abusers’ tactics is instilling fear into their victims. Recent technological advancements have provided more opportunities for abusers to spy on their victims and make them feel afraid.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

Every crime has a set of elements that must be met in order for an individual to be charged with that crime. While every crime is unique with its specific elements, some crimes might seem so similar that it is difficult to distinguish between them. Two of those crimes are domestic violence and civil harassment. The two may seem similar, but each has distinct characteristics. Each must be examined separately so that the elements and concepts behind each are clear and it can be determined which charge is appropriate in a given case.

How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?

Advocates for families and, specifically, victims of domestic violence are making their opinions heard in a Mississippi divorce case that will soon be decided by the state Supreme Court. Opponents of the status quo argue that Mississippi’s laws are antiquated and in desperate need of an overhaul. Of particular interest is the state’s lack of a unilateral no-fault divorce option, something that critics say traps spouses in bad relationships for years longer than necessary, holding them hostage to the whims of controlling and potentially abusive partners.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I have to be living separately to meet with a lawyer about divorce?”

A common complaint of the divorce process is how long it can take. A runner up? How expensive it is. Though both are legitimate complaints regardless of your location, they’re perhaps especially true for residents of Mississippi. Mississippi has the dubious honor of being one of only two states that does not recognize a right to a no-fault divorce. That means that those couples in Mississippi looking to end their marriages need to prove fault and, if no fault is proven or if his or her spouse won’t cooperate, you could effectively become trapped in your marriage, driving up the time and expense associated with the process.