Articles Tagged with Child Custody

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

You have made it through your divorce. Everything has been settled and agreed upon – the distribution of shared items, property, and the custody agreement between you and your ex-spouse. Everything is seemingly “perfect” and everyone knows exactly what is expected of them. While this period of certainty is usually well-deserved, do not let it lull you into a false sense of security. There are still issues that can arise in a child custody agreement. One of those issues is weather.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

Divorces can be messy. Suddenly two people are splitting their assets and lives into two, from what used to be a marriage. Divorce does not only affect the couple getting divorced, however. Oftentimes there are children to be considered. Most parents want what is best for their children, this includes wanting what is best for them in divorce. Custody agreements detail what exactly the arrangement will be between the two parents who will be co-parenting the child.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

When most people think of custody of children, they usually think of disputes between the biological parents. However, custody does not always have to involve a dispute between the parents. In certain circumstances, custody of a child might be awarded to someone other than a parent. This is called third-party custody. In order for custody of a child to be awarded to someone other than a parent, there are a variety of factors to examine to determine if third-party custody is appropriate.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

The act of adultery of one or both spouses is one of the biggest reasons that couples get divorced. North Carolina is a no-fault state in regards to divorce. This means that the spouse who files for divorce is not required to prove that the other spouse is at fault for the divorce. In some states, adultery is one of the “faults” that a spouse can cite as a reason for divorce. This is not true in North Carolina. Nevertheless, adultery can have an impact on a divorce. Alimony payments, child custody, and property distribution can all be affected by adultery.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are not covered by child support?”

Divorce is difficult. You and your soon-to-be ex-spouse are thrust into figuring out marital assets, spousal or alimony payments, and often coming to child custody agreements. Parents want what is best for their children and tend to be sensitive to their children’s feelings and needs during a divorce. In some cases, one of the spouses might want to move out of state. In those instances, there are special considerations for the children involved, which depend on the custody arrangement and any restrictions set forth by the applicable statute.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Who pays for the children’s health insurance and co-pays?”

It is clear that the rules surrounding the use of frozen embryos created as part of the in vitro fertilization, or IVF process are confusing. Couples often wonder whether agreements made prior to undergoing IVF will be deemed enforceable or whether they will instead be forced to fight it out in court with their ex-spouse over ownership of the frozen embryos. A recent series of legal events in Arizona further throws the issue into doubt, raising real questions for those considering IVF in the state.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

The U.S. Supreme Court recently handed down an important victory for supporters of gay parental rights. How did they do that? By remaining silent. The case before the court concerned a lesbian couple in Arizona fighting over custody of their son. The case has been slowly making its way through the court system for years. An appeal was filed to the U.S. Supreme Court after a landmark decision last year by the Arizona Supreme Court, which abolished discrimination between gay and straight couples under state law. The worry by some was that the U.S. Supreme Court would agree to hear the case and potentially disagree with the state court. That did not happen, instead, the Court rejected the appeal, giving no reason for the decision.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are covered by child support?”

The desire to have a child of your own is a powerful one for many people. Though most are able to do so easily, there are many couples who cannot. Either due to age or infertility, it is not always an option to simply go out and have your own biological child. It is for this reason that some couples begin considering alternatives, including hiring a surrogate. Those who go down this road are required to put great faith in not only the woman chosen to act as a surrogate, but also in the legal system to ensure their rights are protected.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

What is a mother? A father? A parent? Though these concepts have long avoided detailed examination by the courts, times are changing and specific definitions will need to be created or, in some cases, changed. As states continue to feel the impact of the Obergefell same-sex marriage case, they have found themselves increasingly drawn into disputes regarding what makes someone a parent, something that requires the courts to lay out a more precise and potentially different definition than in years past.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

Legal battles over custody and child support are miserable for everyone involved. They take time, money and create enormous amounts of stress given the importance of the subject matter: your kids. Though unpleasant, the process should at least be uniformly unpleasant, meaning that everyone suffers equally as these issues are resolved. In Chicago, an outdated court system meant that not all family law issues were handled the same way, putting some families in a better position than others. Thankfully, that two-track system has finally been abolished and all family law matters will be resolved by one unified domestic relations court.