Articles Tagged with Child Custody

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

Most parents do not want their children to become pawns in a divorce. However, emotions are often running high in divorce and even the best parents can become blind to their own behavior. In divorce proceedings, most states allow the testimony of the child and his or her preference on what the custody arrangement should be. North Carolina is one of those states.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I delete old posts or censor new posts while going through a divorce?”

Divorce is difficult. Suddenly, two people who have spent a portion of their lives, regardless of how long or short of a time, together are deciding to end their marriage and separate. Due to the personal nature of divorce, conflict and emotions can run high. It can be difficult to split up assets, reach a custody agreement, and come to a mutual decision on the best division of property. Each side wants what they want and will present evidence to help them get it. One type of evidence that is commonly used in divorce proceedings that you might not expect is social media posts. Social media can have a negative impact on your divorce. The following are some guidelines to social media to consider during divorce proceedings in North Carolina.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

One of the most difficult parts of the divorce and separation process is coming to a custody agreement. It is important to look out for the best interests of the child, but also take into consideration the parents’ feelings and ability to care for the child. As such, there are policies and procedures in place in North Carolina to make sure that child custody agreements are made in the best interest of the child by reducing conflict between the parents. Court can be stressful for all parties involved, especially children, mediation is an alternative way for parties to reach an agreement and avoid the stress of trial.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can any attorney help me with my family law needs in North Carolina?”

The holidays are meant to be a happy time, filled with family and friends. However, parents that have recently divorced might be struggling to figure out how to handle their parental duties and still provide the loving, happy, and special environment that their children are accustomed to during the holidays. Even with the best intentions, though, divorced parents can find it difficult to put aside their personal feelings. The holidays might bring about more trips and “exchanges” of children between the parents, leading to higher tensions and more conflict. The best way for parents to keep the holiday special for their children is to put a plan in place to help them navigate this time and stay organized.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

You have made it through your divorce. Everything has been settled and agreed upon – the distribution of shared items, property, and the custody agreement between you and your ex-spouse. Everything is seemingly “perfect” and everyone knows exactly what is expected of them. While this period of certainty is usually well-deserved, do not let it lull you into a false sense of security. There are still issues that can arise in a child custody agreement. One of those issues is weather.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

Divorces can be messy. Suddenly two people are splitting their assets and lives into two, from what used to be a marriage. Divorce does not only affect the couple getting divorced, however. Oftentimes there are children to be considered. Most parents want what is best for their children, this includes wanting what is best for them in divorce. Custody agreements detail what exactly the arrangement will be between the two parents who will be co-parenting the child.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

When most people think of custody of children, they usually think of disputes between the biological parents. However, custody does not always have to involve a dispute between the parents. In certain circumstances, custody of a child might be awarded to someone other than a parent. This is called third-party custody. In order for custody of a child to be awarded to someone other than a parent, there are a variety of factors to examine to determine if third-party custody is appropriate.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

The act of adultery of one or both spouses is one of the biggest reasons that couples get divorced. North Carolina is a no-fault state in regards to divorce. This means that the spouse who files for divorce is not required to prove that the other spouse is at fault for the divorce. In some states, adultery is one of the “faults” that a spouse can cite as a reason for divorce. This is not true in North Carolina. Nevertheless, adultery can have an impact on a divorce. Alimony payments, child custody, and property distribution can all be affected by adultery.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are not covered by child support?”

Divorce is difficult. You and your soon-to-be ex-spouse are thrust into figuring out marital assets, spousal or alimony payments, and often coming to child custody agreements. Parents want what is best for their children and tend to be sensitive to their children’s feelings and needs during a divorce. In some cases, one of the spouses might want to move out of state. In those instances, there are special considerations for the children involved, which depend on the custody arrangement and any restrictions set forth by the applicable statute.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Who pays for the children’s health insurance and co-pays?”

It is clear that the rules surrounding the use of frozen embryos created as part of the in vitro fertilization, or IVF process are confusing. Couples often wonder whether agreements made prior to undergoing IVF will be deemed enforceable or whether they will instead be forced to fight it out in court with their ex-spouse over ownership of the frozen embryos. A recent series of legal events in Arizona further throws the issue into doubt, raising real questions for those considering IVF in the state.