Articles Tagged with Paternity

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is the amount of child support decided in North Carolina?”

The family dynamic has been changing over the last several decades. Today it is much more acceptable to give birth to children out of wedlock. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, approximately 40.5% of all live births in the United States in 2020 were to unmarried women. While there are many children born to single parents, there are many issues that may arise in regards to child care, custody, support, and visitation. Both parents need to understand their obligations, responsibilities and rights when it comes to their biological children.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I keep my Kids from seeing the other parent?”

A child born during a marriage is automatically considered an heir to both parties of the marriage. However, when a child is born to unmarried parents, the father should establish paternity (the unmarried mother is legally considered the parent).

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” If I remarry, can they look at my new spouse’s income?”

You might think that determining paternity these days would be a fairly simple process. There is no longer a need for lengthy trials, witness testimony and a weighing of factors. A simple, fast, affordable genetic test can arrive at a definitive answer in record time. Though genetic testing allows for speedy resolution to the biological question of paternity, courts have, in some cases, been reluctant to let genetics dictate the answer to the legal question of paternity.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What rules are there for Father’s Right in NC?”

When it comes to paternity, the law in North Carolina has been designed to favor married couples. Married couples benefit because when a child is born to a married couple, the husband and wife are automatically viewed as being legal parents of the child. This can be a great thing in that it immediately bestows important rights and responsibilities on the couple, saving the hassle of having to establish paternity. The problem is that this can work against some couples, specifically, those where the child born during the marriage is not the biological child of the husband. In these cases, the father will have to fight a rather long battle to have the presumption of paternity reversed. To learn more about paternity and how it can prove problematic in certain custody/child support cases, keep reading.

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