Articles Tagged with spousal maintenance

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

As in other states, North Carolina allows for alimony in divorces unders some circumstances. Alimony, also called spousal support or maintenance, is money that one spouse pays to another as part of a divorce order. Alimony is not automatic and is determined on a case-by-case basis using a variety of factors. Alimony may be permanent and might be paid in regular monthly payments or in a lump sum. Post-separation alimony is money that is provided from one spouse to another on an interim basis until the divorce is final.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

Going through a divorce is decidedly one of the most stressful situations you and your family can go through. In North Carolina, couples can request a no-fault divorce. A no-fault divorce means that the couple know they are no longer compatible and the marriage has no chance of being saved. No blame is placed on either party. With any divorce, one person must initiate the process by filing a divorce complaint with the court. The party that initiates the divorce is called the complainant and the other party is the respondent.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

The decision to end your marriage can be a difficult one. Once you know that your marriage is over, you will need to take steps to legally end the union. In North Carolina, a divorce is also called “absolute divorce.” North Carolina allows for no-fault divorce. This means that spouses are no longer able to remain married and the marriage cannot be repaired. Divorce can be complex, especially when you have children or when you have been married a long time. It is helpful to seek guidance from a knowledgeable family law attorney to assist with the process from start to finish.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

Not every marriage ends in a lifetime of happiness with your spouse. Unfortunately, spouses have irreconcilable differences that lead them to file for divorce and legally end their marriage. For some spouses, divorce results in each spouse continuing to work and live his or her separate life, just separate from the former spouse. For others, though, a divorce can cause them to wonder how they will continue in their previous lifestyle. In some instances, one spouse works and makes money to provide for the family, while the other spouse stays home or works at a lesser paying job. A divorce does not have to devastate one, or both, spouses financially. There is a potential for one spouse to receive alimony payments from the other spouse.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

No, we are not talking about trust, the bond of confidence between two people, we are instead talking about something a lot more tangible; trust funds, the popular estate planning vehicle used by more and more families every year. The dissolution of a marriage can impact nearly every aspect of your estate plan, including trusts. To understand more about what divorce might mean for your trust fund and how trust funds can prove helpful in the event of a split, keep reading.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

Though you’ve likely heard of a prenup, either from a friend, a relative or in popular culture, postnups aren’t nearly as common. Though a much newer invention, experts in the family law business say they’re beginning to catch on, with large numbers of family law attorneys reporting an increase in interest from clients. What is a postnup? How does it work? Is there any value? To learn more, keep reading.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

A recent article in the Chicago Tribune discussed the sad case of the divorce of the founder of the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. He and his wife have been embroiled in a dispute for more than eight years now and continue to fight about what share of the marital estate his wife is entitled to. The woman is asking for more than $400,000 a month in spousal maintenance, an astronomical sum to most people. One of her arguments supporting such a figure is the idea that taxes take a big bite out of what she’s already received and she needs more to comfortably pay her bills.

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