Articles Tagged with Divorce process

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Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How Can I protect myself from my spouses spending habits?”

Prenuptial agreements often have a bad reputation. Marriage is “supposed” to be the union of two people who are in love and want to be married forever. When a prenuptial agreement is discussed, people often think of one spouse who is financially better off protecting his or her money in the event that the marriage ends in divorce. They think that it is a sign that the marriage will not last or be successful. This is not true. A prenuptial agreement (“prenup”) is a contract entered into before marriage that will serve as a guide in the event that a divorce happens. While people do not want to think that their marriage will end someday, it is smart to plan for all contingencies and possibilities.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does uncontested divorce mean?”

Going through a divorce can be tough. You are ending a relationship and declaring that you wish your legal marriage be terminated. The very nature of a relationship ending can lead to heightened emotions and turmoil during the divorce process. In an effort to avoid contentious divorces, be mindful of your options; there is an alternative to the traditional contentious divorce proceeding. Couples can decide to engage in a collaborative divorce proceeding.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

Divorce, though seldom celebrated, is a process taken for granted by many in the United States and other countries around the world. Though few people begin a marriage intending to divorce, if the time comes and a relationship deteriorates, it is a very good thing that there are legal methods to unwind a bad marriage. This allows the couple to go their separate ways, freeing up both to be happier on their own rather than forcing them to continue being miserable together.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

We have previously mentioned the possibility that the Republican tax plan currently before Congress could have some unexpected impacts. Though most news reports have focused on the tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires, there are many other smaller changes that will impact wide swaths of society. One of the underreported examples involves alimony.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

Tax reform has been in the news recently, with all sides of the political debate arguing about the best path forward. Some believe taxes are too high and need to be cut across the board. Others believe the cuts should be focused on lower and middle-income Americans. Still others are aiming the primary benefits at the wealthiest individuals and corporations. Which side will ultimately prevails remains to be seen.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How long does getting a divorce take?”

Normally, when we think of waiting periods and divorce, we are talking about the amount of time a couple has to wait before filing for divorce. In a number of states, these waiting periods exist to try and slow the process. Couples are often required to live separately for some period of time before either can file a divorce petition. Legislators say this time forces a couple to think twice (and maybe thrice) before finally pulling the trigger and moving ahead with a divorce. States have begun lowering these wait times, the goal being to further streamline the divorce process and get couples in and out of court faster.

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How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?

Advocates for families and, specifically, victims of domestic violence are making their opinions heard in a Mississippi divorce case that will soon be decided by the state Supreme Court. Opponents of the status quo argue that Mississippi’s laws are antiquated and in desperate need of an overhaul. Of particular interest is the state’s lack of a unilateral no-fault divorce option, something that critics say traps spouses in bad relationships for years longer than necessary, holding them hostage to the whims of controlling and potentially abusive partners.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s been a rough few weeks for a relatively obscure member of Mississippi’s legislature. Andy Gipson was, until earlier this month, seldom on the national news radar. That changed as the state legislature has taken steps to try and address severely antiquated laws surrounding the divorce process. Two different legislators put forward two different measures to try and reform the backwards laws and both were killed before making it to the full chamber by Gipson. His actions resulted in a swift response from critics, with reports indicating that Gipson was deluged in phone calls, emails and social media posts by those who disagreed with his tactics.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

Anyone with friends or family who have been through the process have likely heard how difficult divorce can be. Even putting aside the emotional toll (a hard feat to accomplish), the costs, time, uncertainty and bureaucratic difficulties of divorce can be overwhelming, especially to those with limited financial resources. Legislators in Illinois realized this and made a big effort to roll out a host of changes to the state’s divorce process. These new rules aim to simplify and streamline divorce and custody proceedings as well as standardize the approach taken to awarding spousal maintenance (also known as alimony) and child support.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

Recently released statistics from the National Center for Family & Marriage Research indicate that Americans are increasingly less likely to divorce. The numbers reveal that the divorce rate is at its lowest level in more than 35 years. Though the rate in the U.S. may be low, it’s nowhere near as low as it is in India. A recent New York Times article explored some of the bizarre and interesting legal obstacles couples in India must combat if they want to end their marriages.