Articles Tagged with equitable distribution state

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

Stressful situations can make people do unthinkable things, things that you would never expect an individual could be capable of based off of your experiences with them. During a contentious divorce, you might see a side of your former spouse come out that you never expected. There have been instances in which one spouse makes up stories about the other in an attempt to sway opinion. Lies are told in an attempt to receive more of the marital assets, receive the child custody agreement they want, or even to increase the amount of alimony received. You might think that false allegations will not affect you, but there are real consequences that come with certain allegations. If you are facing the challenge of a false allegation during divorce proceedings, here is what you need to know.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I delete old posts or censor new posts while going through a divorce?”

Divorce is difficult. Suddenly, two people who have spent a portion of their lives, regardless of how long or short of a time, together are deciding to end their marriage and separate. Due to the personal nature of divorce, conflict and emotions can run high. It can be difficult to split up assets, reach a custody agreement, and come to a mutual decision on the best division of property. Each side wants what they want and will present evidence to help them get it. One type of evidence that is commonly used in divorce proceedings that you might not expect is social media posts. Social media can have a negative impact on your divorce. The following are some guidelines to social media to consider during divorce proceedings in North Carolina.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does uncontested divorce mean?”

You have probably heard of a prenuptial agreement (“prenup”) – an agreement entered into by soon-to-be married couples to protect their assets. Prenuptial agreements are not the only agreements that couples have that can protect their assets. A postnuptial agreement (“postnup”) is entered into after a couple has already gotten married. A postnup can be just as important as a prenup. There are many reasons that a couple might want to enter into a postnuptial agreement.