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Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “How much does it cost to get divorced, and how does the billing process work?”

 

Elura Nanos bills herself as an author, a television personality, an entrepreneur, a mother, and of all things a former divorce lawyer. The “former” in her title means that she can provide extra-frank advice about what to look for in a divorce lawyer, since she has no interest in being your divorce lawyer.

Woman on phone Charlotte Divorce Lawyer Mecklenburg Family AttorneyNanos may have left “the life of pinstripes, mahogany desks and secretaries” behind, but she has not stopped giving legal advice, helping “out friends and relatives with their own divorces,” and in the process saving them from the frustration and expense of the divorce system.

That system, Nanos writes, was “more than a little disgusting,” but she trains her disgust upon “the machine of divorce practice in general” as opposed to divorce lawyers themselves, noting that most of the lawyers she encountered were “good, honest, hardworking professionals.”

What divorce lawyers offer, Nanos writes, is similar to what a carpenter offers: knowledge of a specialized area coupled with a specialized set of skills that, by and large, you lack. You pay the lawyer to employ his or her skill, knowledge and expertise to advocate on your behalf.

Lawyers charge varying hourly and flat-fee rates depending on the nature of a case and the actions involved. “There are good and bad lawyers at every price range,” Nanos notes.

Nanos writes that good lawyers refrain from antagonizing their clients when they call to complain about a spouse or ex-spouse. Anyone going through a divorce wants a zealous advocate, but overzealous advocacy can overheat the pot, causing its contents to explode into a bitter, years-long war over what might otherwise be trifling.

Clients, however, are the ultimate arbiters of the conduct of a case. It is the clients who decide what issues in a case will be contested, and whether and to what extent they are willing to fight a spouse or ex-spouse in and out of court. Many times it is the clients who call repeatedly, Nanos writes, running up large bills. She says if there is not a legal reason for making the phone call, then take a friend out to lunch and talk to her—“it will be cheaper and more productive.”

Nanos related  in a January article in U.S. News and World Report how a client of hers incurred hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees by calling every day and asking Nanos to speak to her parakeet over the telephone. The client, Nanos said, believed incorrectly that her ex-spouse would be forced to pay her legal bills, and “was trying to stick it to him.”

At the end of the years-long litigation, however, the client had to pay “the bulk of her own legal bills—birdie time included.”

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, then you need the help of experienced family-law attorneys in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAWMatthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A certified Family-Law Specialist, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state and administrative courts in North Carolina, before the United States District Court for the Western District of North Carolina, and before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/elura-nanos/6-ways-your-divorce-lawye_b_7503618.html

http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2015/01/27/how-youre-making-your-divorce-more-expensive

 

 

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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beautiful_Woman_with_Phone.jpg

 

 

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question ” Are overtime, bonuses, and commissions included in calculating child support?”

 

If you love your business as much as your spouse—or if you do not want to deal with the business complications that may arise when you divorce—you should convince your spouse to enter into a prenuptial agreement.

Wedding photo Charlotte Prenup Lawyer Mecklenburg Divorce AttorneyA prenuptial agreement is an agreement that spouses enter into before they get married. A typical prenuptial agreement will address how a business owned by one spouse will be valued and how any funds related to the business will be distributed.

Business valuations and distributions in the event of divorce can become complicated, especially when, for instance, a business is run as a partnership. One business partner may be divorcing his or her spouse. As a part of the divorce, a court may distribute a percentage of the business ownership interest to the partner’s spouse. Now a partner’s spouse is, in effect, a partner in the business, even though the other partners never consented to this and even though the spouse may know nothing about running the business. In practical terms, the spouse has to be bought off.

This raises a host of other potential issues that many business owners may wish to avoid. First, in order to determine how much to pay a spouse of a partner in order to purchase his or her interest, an overall value of a business must be established. Business valuations can be rather complicated, especially for businesses whose products or services are difficult to quantify.

Businesses and their partner-owners may wish to avoid a premature business valuation for other reasons. A business partner who is going through a divorce may want his or her business to be valued as modestly as possible under the circumstances, in order to minimize the amount to pay to a spouse in order to purchase the interest awarded by a divorce court.

If the business is up for sale to bona fide third parties, however, partners will want the valuation to run as high as possible, in order to maximize the profit on any sale. The higher the sale price, however, the more a divorcing partner has to pay to a partner-spouse. These potential conflicting interests can be avoided by a prenuptial agreement that provides a value and method of distribution to a spouse in the event of divorce.

Prenuptial agreements, however, come with their own hazards. How, for instance, does one broach the subject of divorce (and a prenuptial agreement) in the erstwhile blissful pre-marriage days? That may be easier for some couples than others, depending on the unique dynamics of each couple’s relationship.

Determining whether a prenuptial agreement is necessary may also depend on the nature of the business of putative spouses. Men and women who run their own businesses may be most in need of prenuptial agreements, especially those persons whose businesses offer unique products or services that relatively few people can produce.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, then you need the help of experienced family-law attorneys in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAWMatthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A certified Family-Law Specialist, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state and administrative courts in North Carolina, before the United States District Court for the Western District of North Carolina, and before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-protect-a-business-from-divorce-2015-6

 

 

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“2X6NG” by Luchoang nguyen – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2X6NG.jpg#/media/File:2X6NG.jpg

 

 

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Surprising links found between chores, work, commute times, friendship, divorce

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Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can any attorney help me with my family law needs in North Carolina?”

 

Splitting household chores equally seemed like a good idea at the time, but that was before the divorce. How could one have known that splitting chores increased the odds of getting divorced?

Traffic Jam Charlotte Divorce Lawyer Mecklenburg Family Law AttorneyWell, if you are married and reading this, now you know.

According to researchers in Norway, couples who split household chores equally divorce at a higher rate than those who do not. Researchers believe the “even chore split” leads to the sense of a “business-like partnership” which, in turn, leads to less intimacy and more unhappiness and, in turn, a greater risk of divorce.

The Norwegian study is just one of nine surprising “causes” of divorce chronicled by Prevention.com. Some of the “surprising” divorce “causes” cited by Prevention are not that surprising, are well known and have been chronicled in this blog—among them that couples whose first child is a daughter are far more likely to divorce than couples whose first child is a boy, and that couples who see a serious illness affect a wife are more likely to divorce than couples featuring a healthy wife.

Females are more likely to divorce if they happen to work full-time as doctors. The opposite is true for males. Full-time male doctors have, on average, a lower divorce rate.

One of the more surprising divorce indicators involved the manner of getting to work instead of the work itself. Couples whose work commute is at least forty-five minutes long appear to have a higher rate of divorce than those who do not have such a long commute, according to Swedish researchers whose findings were published in a 2013 issue of the journal Urban Studies. The spike in the divorce rate for long commuters was observed regardless of whether both spouses engaged in the long commute or just one spouse did.

Of course, nearly everyone has heard the expression that what is good for the goose is good for the gander. I would correct the expression to say “What may be good for the goose may (or may not) be good for the gander.” This is true with divorce: just because a close friend (or friends) found that divorce was an appropriate remedy for marital troubles does not mean it is the right remedy for you.

According to researchers who published a study in Social Forces, however, the influence of divorcing friends is a strong one, so strong that researchers found that study participants who had a close friend or family member divorce were an astounding seventy-five percent more likely to divorce from their spouses.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAWMatthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.prevention.com/sex/weird-reasons-divorce

 

 

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“Nitin04″ by Nitreg – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nitin04.jpg#/media/File:Nitin04.jpg

 

 

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Say No to social media and Yes to your marriage, says psychologist

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

 

Attorneys have long used Facebook and other social-media sites to compile evidence in divorce cases. Married users by the thousand have found out about their spouses’ cheating hearts through decidedly unceremonious Facebook status updates.

Bad typing posture Uptown Charlotte Divorce Lawyer Mecklenburg Child Custody Law FirmNow researchers are cautioning married couples against using social media altogether, warning that social-media activity may be driving a wedge between couples and speeding them on towards divorce.

The play-by-play of divorce filings, the back-and-forth of hearings, and one-sided accounts of reactions to testimony and rulings of various courts have been chronicled on social media to no end. At least one judge in New York is allowing parties to serve divorce complaints on adverse parties through Facebook.

With the ever-changing “relationship status,” Facebook took the lead in social media’s dabbling in divorce, but it is not alone. The 900-million users of Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are the new face of divorce, says Terre Haute, Indiana-based psychologist Bridget Roberts-Pittman.

It may appear, Roberts-Pittman told WTHI-TV, that social-media sites are the “it” factor in an increasing number of divorces, but she said that depends on how one defines “it.” She said that many couples encounter bumps in their relationships, and that “things like Facebook and Twitter can be the grease that slips [things] right out of control.”

In general, Roberts-Pittman said, while social-media sites enable people to communicate instantly with literally tens, hundreds, even thousands of people around the globe, electronic communications can also serve to create a barrier to face-to-face communication with those closest to a people, i.e. spouses.

In an ironic sense, then, “social media is disconnecting relationships on websites intended to keep people connected.”

A recent British study examining the relationship between social-media activity and divorces found that one-in-seven people interviewed had considered divorce based on a spouse’s questionable social-media activity.

Questionable social-media activity has led to a boom in business for private investigators. Greg Miller, a private investigator with Citizen’s Securing and Investigation in Terre Haute, told WTHI-TV that many of his customers have told him that social-media sites like Facebook have ruined their marriages.

To a private investigator like Miller, the sites serve as a kind of treasure map that he is able to use to track down the proverbial “other man or woman.” Except, all too often, Miller said, the other man or woman is not proverbial. He or she is real, and is the physical manifestation of the division between a husband and wife. All-to-often, social media served as the grease that smoothed a spouse’s transition out of marriage and into the arms of another paramour.

Social-media sites cannot, however, settle the issues that arise from behavior that ensues as a result of the connections they help foster. Those issues—divorce, alimony, custody of children, child support—must be hammered out in the real world, between real people, where the consequences of a person’s choices are real.

Faced with those potential consequences, many experts—including Roberts-Pittman—are encouraging couples who have said “I do” to marriage to say “I don’t” to social media.

Doing so could save their marriages.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAWMatthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://wthitv.com/2015/05/19/divorce-until-twitter-do-us-part/

 

 

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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Woman-typing-on-laptop2.jpg

 

 

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Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “How can an attorney help me with my Divorce or Separation in North Carolina?”

 

Think divorce is tough? It’s not tough enough, say activists and legislators in several American states.

Family Values Charlotte Divorce Lawyer Mecklenburg Family Law AttorneySeveral high-profile American politicians—among them former presidential candidates Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry and Rick Santorum—have signed a “Marriage Vow” document produced in 2011 by the conservative organization Family Leader, according to Newsweek.

After taking the vow, policymakers would push legislation that promoted “prompt reform of uneconomic, anti-marriage aspects of welfare policy, tax policy, and marital/divorce law,” Newsweek reports.

The states of Arizona and Utah recently passed laws mandating marriage counseling courses and longer waiting periods for couples wanting a divorce. Legislators in Oklahoma, meanwhile, are considering a law that would require parenting classes for couples with children who are seeking a divorce. Couples in the State of Massachusetts who have children under the age of eighteen and seek a divorce are required to attend a six-hour parenting course, while couples in Arkansas must wait through a standard 540-day divorce processing period after living separate and apart for eighteen months. Both of the Carolinas and Maryland require yearlong separations before couples can file for divorce.

Some attorneys like New York lawyer Matthew Reischer think that making divorce more difficult is a good thing. He told Newsweek that if couples knew divorcing was difficult, they would exercise more caution and intelligence when marrying in the first place.

National divorce columnist Colleen Sheehy Orme, however, says that people are the problem, not laws. She said vindictive spouses play a cat-and-mouse game of “legalized bullying” and needlessly drag out divorce cases, swallowing up already stressed court resources.

Newsweek makes it clear where it stands on the issue, calling it “good news” that lawmakers in some states are trying to make divorce easier. California attorney Rackham Karlsson described a pilot program launched in that state’s capital, Sacramento, called One Day Divorce. Couples pay a $435 filing fee, per party (so $870 total), to “finalize their divorces quickly, cheaply and, most importantly, out of the courtroom.”

A supervising judge in the family law division of the Sacramento Superior Court gushed about the program, telling Newsweek that couples using the One Day Divorce program “are universally smiling and overflowing with joy to the point of high-fiving and hugging their volunteer attorneys—and just as frequently their newly divorced ex.”

Newsweek also cited a new application called Web Divorce Prep—“an online divorce documentation and record-keeping software platform”—geared towards making the process of divorce “easier,” as well as the not-so-new so-called “destination divorce” trend, ending its report with an anecdote from a self-ascribed “divorce encouragist” who said she and her husband split their assets themselves and only had to hire a lawyer “to file.”

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAW Matthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.newsweek.com/breaking-hard-do-arkansas-why-divorce-laws-are-getting-stricter-332531

 

 

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question ” I’m not getting along with my husband. We’ve been married two weeks and it was a mistake. Can’t I just get an annulment?”

 

Then-Alaska Governor Sarah Palin and her family were thrust into the media spotlight in 2008 when Arizona Senator and then-presidential candidate John McCain named Palin as his running mate in the political race against (then Senator, now President) Barack Obama and running-mate Joseph Biden.

Bristol Palin Charlotte Divorce Lawyer Mecklenburg Family Law FirmSince McCain’s and Palin’s defeat, Palin and her family have been no strangers to the spotlight, with numerous television appearances, at least two reality television shows, and all manner of media reports, appearances and exposes featuring members of the Palin family.

Palin’s twenty-four-year-old daughter, Bristol, appeared in ABC’s television show Dancing With the Stars in 2014 and early 2015. Long before making headlines on the dance competition show, however, the younger Palin made news headlines for a much more personal matter: the birth of her son, Tripp, and her brief engagement to Levi Johnston.

The Palin-Johnston romance—featuring “one love child, two breakups and eight years of dating”—was so well-chronicled (and interesting, evidently) that media sources have continued to follow Bristol Palin, reporting on her recent engagement to ex-Marine and Medal-of-honor recipient Dakota Meyer.

Now, the Daily Mail reports, Bristol Palin is heartbroken again, and this time a secret marriage torpedoed her prospects at matrimonial happiness.

Back in 2008—the same year as Sarah Palin’s vice-presidential campaign—a then-nineteen-year-old Meyer married a young woman named Cassandra Wain in his home state of Kentucky. Meyer and Wain ultimately divorced in 2010. A friend of Wain’s told the Daily Mail that the marriage was a “mistake,” that Meyer and Wain remained civil and that the pair had been in touch as recently as October of last year.

Unfortunately, Bristol Palin did not know Meyer had been married, and only found out about the “secret marriage” recently. Now her marriage to Meyer is off, according to media reports.

Now for the fortunate side of the news: It’s a good thing Palin found out about the “secret marriage” before she married Meyer. Untangling her marriage on the basis of Meyer’s “secret marriage,” while possible, would likely have caused some unnecessary headaches.

In North Carolina, as in many states, a judge can “annul” a marriage in certain circumstances. Unlike a divorce, an annulment voids a marriage—or creates a situation in which, legally speaking, the marriage never existed.

The annulment would be the preferred legal device for a person in Bristol Palin’s shoes, if she had gone through with the wedding to Meyer and only found out about the “secret marriage” afterwards. Palin would be able to argue that Meyer had premised his marriage proposal on false information, and that if Palin had known about the “secret marriage,” she would not have married Meyer.

In North Carolina, parties can obtain an annulment where one party lacks the mental capacity to understand what a marriage is, where one party is impotent or underage, or where a marriage has occurred between family members, or where one party has relied on false information when agreeing to marry.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAW Matthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3086757/Bristol-Palin-s-wedding-CALLED-Sarah-Palin-announces-cancelled-nuptials-Facebook-post-days-ex-Marine-groom-s-secret-ex-wife-revealed.html

http://www.ew.com/article/2012/10/09/dwts-mark-ballas-on-bristol-palin-brawl-at-some-point-you-fight

http://abc.go.com/shows/dancing-with-the-stars

http://radaronline.com/exclusives/2014/05/bristol-palin-levi-johnston-tripp-child-support-custody-battle-court/

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/PDF/ByArticle/Chapter_50/Article_1.pdf

 

 

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Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

 

Joe Naugler says his “free range” children have been free to roam his twenty-six acre Breckenridge, Kentucky property—called “Blessed Little Homestead”—since their infancy.

Muddy Shoes Mecklenburg Divorce Lawyer Charlotte Family Law FirmNaugler’s brand of off-the-grid daily living and raising children has raised more than eyebrows in Breckenridge County. Naugler’s ten children were seized by Child Protective Services last week, according to the Daily Mail, after investigators found that the family was living in a tent, that Nicole Naugler—Joe Naugler’s pregnant wife and the mother of their ten children—had given birth in a tent, that the homestead had no running water or septic system, and that none of the Naugler children were enrolled in school.

Appearing in court to seek to regain custody of the children, Joe Naugler said that the children are homeschooled and that they are “at liberty to go or do what they want on their land,” according to the Daily Mail. That land—Child Protective Services officials allege–contains “numerous piles of garbage, broken glass and nails… scattered about the property…” and a pond with “no barrier around it to prevent the children from entering or falling in.” The Naugler children range in age from five to seventeen years.

Naugler’s nineteen-year-old estranged son appeared at the custody hearing on Monday and accused Joe Naugler of physical, sexual and mental abuse. The now adult son said he had not seen his father in nearly fifteen years, as he was removed from Joe Naugler’s custody when the boy was just four-and-a-half years old. “We had a very dysfunctional relationship,” he told the court.

The Naugler’s updated their “Blessed Little Homestead” page on social media site Facebook following the hearing, reporting that the judge ruled that their children would remain in the custody of Child Protective Services while the investigation into their free-range parenting continues.

The Nauglers say they are seeking to live “a simple, back to basics life,” and that they have been targeted by local authorities who disagree with their approach to parenting. They contend that Breckenridge County Sheriff Todd Pate and other officers entered their property without a warrant or probable cause, seized the couple’s children and arrested the Nauglers. Officers visited the property to conduct a welfare check, according to media reports.

Nicole Naugler was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest after fleeing when Sheriff Pate and another deputy arrived at the Naugler’s property, officials have alleged. Nicole Naugler said she was trying to protect her children from the officers and that she was slammed belly-first against a police cruiser after being pulled over.

Joe Naugler, meanwhile, was charged with misdemeanor “menacing.” The menacing charge stemmed from a confrontation over water involving Naugler and a deputy, according to WBKO. The Nauglers were due to be arraigned on criminal charges on Tuesday.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAW Matthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3077706/Alex-Brow-Joe-Naugler-s-son-testifies-against-free-range-father-Kentucky-court.html

http://www.saveourfamily.info/

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/lovejoyfeminism/2015/05/technically-nicole-naugler-is-not-a-homeschool-mom.html

http://www.wnd.com/2015/05/state-seizes-kids-from-family-living-off-grid/

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/Statutes/statute.aspx?id=19733

http://www.wbko.com/home/headlines/Off-grid-Couple-Faces-Hearing-to-Regain-Child-Custody-303273911.html

 

 

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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Shoes-in-Mud-2759.jpg

 

 

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Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “How can an attorney help me with my Divorce or Separation in North Carolina?”

 

Since its inception, the online realm’s “open source” mantra has seen so-called techies from points all over the world collaborating for the betterment of online humanity. That seemed at least to be the idea of the internet in its early days.

Hand shaking Charlotte Divorce Law Firm Mecklenburg Family Law AttorneyIt would be fair to say that since its early days, the net has been corrupted by consumerism, corporatism, celebrity, greed and a host of other unfortunate and downright negative “isms.” Sticking to its initial impetus, however, it was only a matter of time before Silicon Valley techies who love words like “synergy” developed “Wevorce.”

Yes, it is the word “We” attached to the front of the word “Divorce,” and even more frighteningly, Wevorce—“a startup that uses technology and mediators to give parting couples a more amicable—and cheaper—option for divorce” is manned by “a new online network of experts” called the “weCommunity.”

Yes, the term “community” needed a “we” attached to the front of the word to connote just how about “us” it is. Wevorce’s weCommunity features a bevy of “real estate agents, mortgage brokers, insurance agents, counselors, accountants, financial advisers and estate planners” who can help divorcing couples figure out… well, everything! At least, that’s the pitch.

So far, the San Mateo, California-based startup serves most of Northern California, where it “has facilitated the divorce of hundreds of couples, including several in the Bay Area,” the Silicon Beat reports. “The Bay Area,” by the way, means the San Francisco, California Bay Area. The $2 million the company secured in funding nearly two years ago is being used to expand the company’s reach across the fruited plain.

And that’s just what Wevorce is doing: It is ready to roll out its services to customers elsewhere and everywhere, presumably in any far-flung locale within internet’s reach. According to the Silicon Beat, the startup collects “a flat fee that is decided up front.” The size of the fee depends “partly on how complicated” the assets of a divorcing couple are to divide. Wevorce keeps sixty-percent of the fee, “and the mediator keeps the rest.” The Beat did not explain how the real estate agents, mortgage brokers, insurance agents, counselors, accountants, financial advisers and estate planners in the weCommunity are paid. At the time it secured its funding, the TechTimes reported that Wevorce charges divorcing couples about a third of the average $27,000 couples spend on divorces.

The aim of Wevorce, aside from providing a lower-cost alternative to divorcing couples, is to bring the “slow-moving courts to the Web,” according to the Beat. To do that, the company combines “software, video conferencing and other online tools” to help couples “mediate—not litigate” the ends of their marriages.

Attorneys are involved, evidently. They help Wevorce customers “plan their future through in-person meetings or video chats.” All in all, says chief executive officer and co-founder Michelle Crosby, Wevorce can “bring a little peace to the often roiled process” of divorce, according to the Beat.

Crosby herself is a family lawyer and mediator. She told OregonLive that the experience of watching her own parents divorce compelled her, in part, to develop Wevorce.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAW Matthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.siliconbeat.com/2015/05/05/wevorce-adds-online-network-of-professionals-to-help-families-through-divorce/

http://www.oregonlive.com/kiddo/index.ssf/2015/01/wevorce_aims_to_make_divorce_l.html

http://techcrunch.com/2013/11/21/wevorce-funding/

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/1625/20131123/wevorce-raises-1-7-mn-in-seed-funding-to-make-divorce-less-painful.htm

 

 

Image Credit

“Handshake (3575000735)” by Aidan Jones – Handshake. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Handshake_(3575000735).jpg#/media/File:Handshake_(3575000735).jpg

 

 

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A Hollywood starlet’s ex-flame has sued to prevent the destruction of embryos the couple created through in-vitro fertilization.

Bear Embryo Charlotte Family Attorney Mecklenburg Divorce LawyerThe starlet—Sofia Vergara—told Good Morning America that her ex-flame—businessman and banking heir Nick Loeb—was trying to take advantage of her celebrity to promote himself. Vergara is promoting her latest feature film—a comedy named Hot Pursuit, which opens in theaters in the United States this week, according to the Daily Mail.

Loeb—appearing on the Today show—rebuffed Vergara’s claims, saying his legal action had nothing to do with her. Loeb said “lives were created” through the in-vitro fertilization process, and he acted to protect the embryos.

Loeb filed his action in August 2014, asking a court to order the female embryos to be brought to term using a surrogate. He would then raise the children.

“I can give these children a wonderful life,” Loeb told Today. “These girls will be raised knowing that they have a father who fought for them.” Loeb added that he offered to allow Vergara to waive all financial responsibility for the children, and has said he would raise them by himself.

In an editorial published in the New York Times, Loeb alleged that Vergara’s lawyer—Fred Silberberg—told reporters that Vergara wanted to keep the embryos frozen indefinitely, which Loeb said would be “tantamount to killing them.”

Loeb also told Today that he would be happy seeing Vergara and fiancé-actor Joe Manganiello “take the embryos and bring them to full term” as long as he was involved in the process.

The legal lines concerning embryos created using the process of in-vitro fertilization are still being drawn. Illinois courts have been wrestling for four years with a lawsuit brought by a Chicago man who wants to prevent his ex-girlfriend from bringing embryos they created to term. Courts have focused in that case on the nature of the contract—if any—between the complainants in the suit, but some legal scholars challenge whether a contract between the “creators” of an embryo should dictate the fate of the embryo.

Some states—New York and Texas are two—enforce the contracts between embryo “creators,” while others, such as Tennessee, allow the party wishing to avoid procreation to prevail as long as “the other party had a reasonable alternative option for becoming a parent.” Some states allow destruction of embryos only upon mutual consent of the parties.

The New Yorker estimates that between six-hundred thousand and one-million embryos are frozen in the United States. Writing for the New Yorker, Madeleine Schwartz notes that “both the law and language” surrounding embryos are struggling to keep apace of the actions and choices of couples who are creating them.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAW Matthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3071987/Sofia-Vergara-ex-head-head-battle-embryos-says-wants-protect-lives-created-says-s-got-trying-advantage-career.html

http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/who-owns-pre-embryos

 

 

Image Credit

“Baer embryos” by Karl Ernst von Baer Romanes, G. J. after Haeckel, E. – “Über Entwickelungsgeschichte der Thiere” Bd. I-II. Königsberg, 1828, 1837http://home.tiscalinet.ch/biografien/biografien/baer.htmhttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Haeckel_drawings.jpg. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Baer_embryos.png#/media/File:Baer_embryos.png

 

 

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question ” If I remarry, can they look at my new spouse’s income?”

 

The single greatest source of tension for married couples is money, and the more scarce money is, the more likely a couple is to divorce.

Man working Charlotte Custody Lawyer Mecklenburg Divorce AttorneyWhile the “number of married, college-educated couples” who divorce within seven years of marriage has fallen by nearly a quarter in the last thirty years, the divorce rate among couples who make twice the federal poverty guideline (or just over $30,000 annually) has remained stagnant during the same period, according to the Washington Post.

Andrew Cherbin, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, told the Post that the divorce rate among poorer couples may be tied to “economic inequality in the country. The more unequal the earning opportunities,” Cherbin said, “the greater the marriage gaps [are] between the classes.”

Writing for the Post, Darlena Cunha claims the research on divorce shows educated and less-educated women moving in opposite directions. In the past two decades, divorces among college-educated women have fallen, while the rate of divorces among women without college degrees has either stagnated or risen.

Bill Doherty, a professor of social science at the University of Minnesota, told Cunha that changing expectations and the changing role of men in marriages may be to blame for the disparity in divorce rates. In general, Doherty said, people interested in marriage want to find someone who contributes equally to household income, “regardless of income bracket. Unless you have a good economic base and a certain level of personal maturity,” Doherty said, “it can be very hard to survive this ideal of modern marriage.”

The immaturity of many modern American men, Cunha suggests, is leading more women to seek to call it quits. She cites the example of “Cece Azadi of Alabama,” who said that once she realized she was the only reliable person in her marriage making money, “there wasn’t much reason to hold onto the marriage.”

Doherty said women are exhibiting a willingness to work hard in school to try to move upwards in their social class, while “the lower-income men, who previously have been shielded from financial instability with factory and industrial jobs, are being left behind.” The numbers, unfortunately, do not reflect that men have caught on.

As Cunha notes, male students comprise just forty-three percent of both higher-education enrollment and students graduating with four-year degrees. Doherty said that more and more women are getting fed up with men who either fail or refuse to carry their own weight. Traditionally, he said, most divorces have been initiated by women. That is still true today, but the disparity in divorces between educated and “less educated mothers” has grown.

Doherty attributes that to women realizing, in increasing numbers, that their partners are not interested in carrying their own weight, which is causing them to move on.

If you find yourself facing a complicated family law matter, it is best to consult with an experienced family-law attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina who can help guide you through the often confusing process of divorce. Please contact the experienced family-law attorneys at Arnold & Smith, PLLC today at (855) 370-2828 or find additional resources here.

 

 

About the Author

ARNOLD & SMITH LAW Matthew Arnold is a Managing Member of Arnold & Smith, PLLC, where he focuses on the areas of family law, divorce, child custody, child support, alimony and equitable distribution.

Mr. Arnold was born and raised in Charlotte, where he graduated from Providence Senior High School. He attended Belmont Abbey College, where he graduated cum laude, before attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a full academic scholarship.

A board-certified specialist in the practice of Family Law, Mr. Arnold is admitted to practice in all state courts in North Carolina, in the United States Federal Court for the Western District of North Carolina, in the North Carolina Court of Appeals and Supreme Court, and in the Fourth Circuit United States Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia.

In his free time, Mr. Arnold enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife and three children.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/05/04/men-are-to-blame-for-the-high-divorce-rate-among-americas-poor/

 

 

Image Credit

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lewis_Hine_Power_house_mechanic_working_on_steam_pump.jpg

 

 

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