Articles Tagged with divorce privacy

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is social media evidence used in divorce proceedings?”

It’s a terrible story that never seems to end. More than six years ago, Anthony Weiner first grabbed headlines due to some inappropriate photographs posted onto his personal Twitter feed. The scandal that followed was enough to cost him his seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. Though many may have hoped that was the last of Anthony Weiner, it now seems like only the beginning. Weiner would later mount a bid for mayor of New York City, come close to winning and then watch as his campaign unraveled over another sexual messaging scandal. Years would pass before yet a third scandal erupted, this time involving a minor. The latest episode (which arguably had an impact on the 2016 presidential election) was finally enough for Huma Abedin, who decided to file for divorce and separate herself from Weiner and his various shenanigans once and for all.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold being interviewed on the Legal Forum. This was recorded in Charlotte, North Carolina.

It’s a question that few people think about until it’s too late: what happens if your electronic privacy is compromised? There are a lot of reasons for this. Some people think they just aren’t interesting enough to worry as they don’t have dirt worth digging up. Others (mistakenly) believe their password will serve as a fortress, shielding their secrets forever. For others, it never even crosses their mind that a significant other would try to do something like invade their privacy. The reality is that, in some sad cases, individuals learn the hard truth that privacy, especially online, is incredibly hard to maintain.

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Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can you guarantee I will get the resolution I want?”

Two Minnesota State legislators say the very idea of divorce implicates the court system, and that implication leads to another, critical assumption: that parties to a divorce case are adversaries.