Articles Tagged with military divorce

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

Whether you are in the military, or you have a spouse who is in the military, you experience particular strains to your marriage that not every couple does. Dealing with the high-pressure work and the extreme separations can take a toll. Unfortunately, sometimes the strain results in divorce. In fact, in any given year, there can be as many as 30,000 military divorces. As in any divorce, taking care of the physical, emotional, and mental needs of children can be complicated. Some might say that children’s issues are even more complicated in military divorces. If you are part of a military couple seeking to terminate their marriage, an experienced divorce attorney can help.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

What factors lead to divorce? It could be problems communicating, a lack of money, an abundance of money, disagreements about children, about in-laws, about chores, about infidelity. Working too much or too little is also a common issue in the demise of a relationship. There are too many to name and each divorce involves factors unique to that marriage. That said, it appears that what a person does for a living might be one (of a multitude) of things that can make it more or less likely that he or she eventually divorces.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s rare that spousal support cases make their way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices are usually grappling with weighty issues involving constitutional rights, but occasionally make time for less headline-grabbing matters. Recently, that’s exactly what the Court did, hearing and then deciding a small case with an even smaller amount of money on the line. Though the ruling won’t go down in history, it does clarify an area of confusion in the law and will bring certainty to a number of other military divorces.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does uncontested divorce mean?”

Divorce can be a complicated affair for any family, but for military families, the matter can be even more complex. It should go without saying that military families in general face unique challenges that civilian families do not; deployment and placement elsewhere on duty means that military parents and their children must grow used to being away from each other for extended periods of time. However, no matter how accustomed to physical separation a military family may grow out of necessity, many are not prepared for the more permanent fissure of divorce.