Articles Tagged with Charlotte Divorce

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s been a rough few weeks for a relatively obscure member of Mississippi’s legislature. Andy Gipson was, until earlier this month, seldom on the national news radar. That changed as the state legislature has taken steps to try and address severely antiquated laws surrounding the divorce process. Two different legislators put forward two different measures to try and reform the backwards laws and both were killed before making it to the full chamber by Gipson. His actions resulted in a swift response from critics, with reports indicating that Gipson was deluged in phone calls, emails and social media posts by those who disagreed with his tactics.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

One of the most common complaints about divorce is that the process takes so long. Between waiting periods to file, the slow court process and uncooperative spouses, it can take months or longer for a divorce to make its way through the legal system. As a result, some states have begun to take action to speed things up. Mandatory wait times are being decreased and processes are being streamlined, especially in cases where there are no children. Though increasing speed is important in the U.S., lawmakers in other countries are desperate to slow things down.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

Going through a divorce with kids can be incredibly difficult. Divorce is bad enough as it is, but the added stress of worrying how the divorce will impact your kids, the pain of creating new routines, of dividing parenting responsibilities and of creating a visitation arrangement that’s workable, is even harder. Given how difficult divorce with kids already is, it’s certainly not helpful for a judge to actively attempt to make the process even worse. This what appears to have happened recently in Kentucky, where one family court judge was recently reprimanded for treating divorced couples with children differently than those without.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

We’ve discussed pets and divorce previously and the issue is almost always handled the same way no matter where you are. Though we might consider our pets part of the family, the fact is that the law does not. In fact, in a divorce, courts across the country have long operated under the assumption that pets are no different than any other piece of property. Rather than subjecting the division of the pets to the same kind of best interest test that children enjoy, pets get allocated between the parties like a couch or some old dishes.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

A recent divorce case in Canada dealt with the thorny issue of what to do with a pet after a divorce. The couple in question had three dogs and the wife had asked that she be given custody of all the pets, but requested that the judge grant visitation for 1.5 hours each week to her ex-husband. Though this might seem like a fair compromise, the judge presiding over the case took the opportunity to clearly lay out why he believes courts have no business intervening in such matters.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are covered by child support?”

When you make the decision to divorce, you might understandably believe that what once was a lifetime connection to your former spouse gets severed. Though it’s true the nature of your relationship will change in many ways, some official and legal, some not so much, it doesn’t always mean that you’re able to neatly part ways. In some cases, when a former spouse dies you might find yourself embroiled in issues you thought were safely in the past.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

There is nothing quite like a divorce case to air a couple’s dirty laundry, whether it is on an individual or collective basis for the parties involved. Personal details, financial issues, lascivious allegations—a divorce case has the power to bring all of this to the surface.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does uncontested divorce mean?”

Divorce can be a complicated affair for any family, but for military families, the matter can be even more complex. It should go without saying that military families in general face unique challenges that civilian families do not; deployment and placement elsewhere on duty means that military parents and their children must grow used to being away from each other for extended periods of time. However, no matter how accustomed to physical separation a military family may grow out of necessity, many are not prepared for the more permanent fissure of divorce.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can any attorney help me with my family law needs in North Carolina?”

Several recent articles and blogs have highlighted a topic that many divorce attorneys and clients alike forget to keep in mind: the ways in which introverts handle issues like heartbreak and divorce differently.

Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

If you pay off your neutral custody arbitrator, allegedly manipulate police into investigating your ex-wife’s new beau, and try to get your ex-wife kicked out of the Catholic Church but still don’t get the custody arrangement you want…sue your ex for $10 million for manipulating you? This seems to be Bill O’Reilly’s train of thought as of late.