Articles Tagged with Divorce judge

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

If you have been through a divorce you understand that interaction with the legal system is a requirement. No matter how agreeable you and your ex might be, a judge will still have to be involved. Someone, maybe not you, but your attorney, will have to set foot in a courtroom. Formal papers will need to be submitted to clerks. Hearings and deadlines and other judicial-related hoops will need to be jumped through. And that’s if things are reasonably cooperative. If you and your ex are at each other’s throats the justice system can become much more invasive.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is an Absolute Divorce?”

Many people have skewed views of what happens in a courtroom. Television and movies have done a disservice to our understanding of what really goes in when you’re in front of a judge. We expect fireworks, tears, shocking revelations, audible gasps from the jury and if we don’t get it we’re disappointed. The reality is that in the vast (and I mean vast) majority of cases, you’re simply trying to hold people’s attention. Just as one example, discovery obligations and rules of evidence make it unlikely that surprises will occur, both sides usually see any “surprise” coming long before it’s ever presented in court.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

Going through a divorce with kids can be incredibly difficult. Divorce is bad enough as it is, but the added stress of worrying how the divorce will impact your kids, the pain of creating new routines, of dividing parenting responsibilities and of creating a visitation arrangement that’s workable, is even harder. Given how difficult divorce with kids already is, it’s certainly not helpful for a judge to actively attempt to make the process even worse. This what appears to have happened recently in Kentucky, where one family court judge was recently reprimanded for treating divorced couples with children differently than those without.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How does custody work if one parent moves internationally?”

A common complaint from those currently going through or recently emerging from a North Carolina divorce is that the whole process simply takes too long. Meeting with lawyers, filing the necessary documents, dealing with custody, agreeing to a settlement and getting everything finalized can take time, sometimes a long time. The problem of a slow divorce process is apparently not unique to the United States, as French citizens have complained and lawmakers are considering taking action to speed the process along.

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

It is exceptionally rare for a divorce settlement, once finalized, to be thrown out. But that’s exactly what happened in the case of Terrence Howard, who convinced a California superior court judge to toss the settlement reached with Howard’s second wife Michelle Ghent. That divorce was signed and finalized in 2012, making the decision all the more remarkable for reopening a divorce long since closed.

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get the judge to order my spouse to pay my attorney’s fees in a property division case?”

A Texas man who accused a judge of conspiring with the Baylor University medical system and the doctor who testified in his divorce and child custody case is claiming his free-speech rights protect statements he made online and in telephone calls to the judge.