Articles Tagged with divorce lawyer

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold being interviewed on the Legal Forum. This was recorded in Charlotte, North Carolina.

It’s a question that few people think about until it’s too late: what happens if your electronic privacy is compromised? There are a lot of reasons for this. Some people think they just aren’t interesting enough to worry as they don’t have dirt worth digging up. Others (mistakenly) believe their password will serve as a fortress, shielding their secrets forever. For others, it never even crosses their mind that a significant other would try to do something like invade their privacy. The reality is that, in some sad cases, individuals learn the hard truth that privacy, especially online, is incredibly hard to maintain.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s been a rough few weeks for a relatively obscure member of Mississippi’s legislature. Andy Gipson was, until earlier this month, seldom on the national news radar. That changed as the state legislature has taken steps to try and address severely antiquated laws surrounding the divorce process. Two different legislators put forward two different measures to try and reform the backwards laws and both were killed before making it to the full chamber by Gipson. His actions resulted in a swift response from critics, with reports indicating that Gipson was deluged in phone calls, emails and social media posts by those who disagreed with his tactics.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I have to be living separately to meet with a lawyer about divorce?”

A common complaint of the divorce process is how long it can take. A runner up? How expensive it is. Though both are legitimate complaints regardless of your location, they’re perhaps especially true for residents of Mississippi. Mississippi has the dubious honor of being one of only two states that does not recognize a right to a no-fault divorce. That means that those couples in Mississippi looking to end their marriages need to prove fault and, if no fault is proven or if his or her spouse won’t cooperate, you could effectively become trapped in your marriage, driving up the time and expense associated with the process.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I delete old posts or censor new posts while going through a divorce?”

When it comes to marriage and divorce, we are used to thinking that people can do as they wish. Thankfully, the government seldom decides to play matchmaker, telling people who to marry or when to divorce. Though this is almost always an issue left up to individuals, there are some very special circumstances where courts (and possibly even state legislatures) decide to get involved, deciding on behalf of others when or if they are allowed to marry or divorce.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

A recent article by Bloomberg dived deep into the world of post-divorce finance. It’s a subject that few people understand and even fewer are interested in learning about. Though dull, it can be quite important, especially when fees start to add up. Specifically, the article discussed a common charge that some in the family law world have dubbed the “divorce penalty”. What is it? A QDRO.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How will the judge divide our property?”

A recent divorce case in Canada dealt with the thorny issue of what to do with a pet after a divorce. The couple in question had three dogs and the wife had asked that she be given custody of all the pets, but requested that the judge grant visitation for 1.5 hours each week to her ex-husband. Though this might seem like a fair compromise, the judge presiding over the case took the opportunity to clearly lay out why he believes courts have no business intervening in such matters.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are covered by child support?”

When you make the decision to divorce, you might understandably believe that what once was a lifetime connection to your former spouse gets severed. Though it’s true the nature of your relationship will change in many ways, some official and legal, some not so much, it doesn’t always mean that you’re able to neatly part ways. In some cases, when a former spouse dies you might find yourself embroiled in issues you thought were safely in the past.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does uncontested divorce mean?”

If you’re preparing for a divorce it’s a fact that things like the length of your marriage can play a role in how assets are divided and how much alimony is awarded. Courts care about time because they want to be sure that long-lasting relationships are valued and that potential scams or quickie marriages aren’t rewarded with hefty settlements.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold being interviewed on the Legal Forum. This was recorded in Charlotte, North Carolina. Topics discussed include: How to choose a divorce lawyer? How long does a divorce take? How much does a divorce cost? When can a person get an annulment?

For many people who are thinking about or have gone through divorce, it can be all too easy to imagine the circumstances that could lead to you wanting to slip a secret GPS on your partner or soon-to-be ex’s car.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

Everyone knows there are lots of reasons why a marriage might come to an end. Money problems, infidelity, health issues, disagreements about how to raise the kids, career stress, you name it. Though there are lots of causes, most people choose the lower conflict no-fault route when seeking their divorce. Even if a partner cheated on the other, most people filing prefer to avoid the mess of accusing the other party of misdeeds and instead say that the marriage ended due to no one’s fault. Though most people may prefer the quieter approach, some occasionally like to name names.