Articles Tagged with divorce settlement

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

When it comes to custody issues during and after a divorce, it can be very hard for families to navigate the complexities of two parents, two homes and multiple opposing ideas of what is right. One of the most difficult custody issues to resolve is when one parent decides to relocate out-of-state, something that forces a court to upend the previously agreed to parenting plan.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” Is there some property that the judge cannot divide?”

Divorce is tough for almost everyone, but the Stephensons are having a particularly long and tumultuous time of it—with an emphasis on long. The multimillionaire founder of private hospital network Cancer Treatment Centers of America and his wife are now in their seventh year of divorce court and have finally reached the trial stage after failing to reach a settlement privately.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What happens when a person’s income is not guaranteed and fluctuates from year to year”.

Everyone knows it can be contentious trying to reach a mutually agreeable divorce settlement. The parties often have completely opposite interests and view the divorce division of assets as a zero sum game. Given this competition over finite resources, it isn’t surprising to see couples bickering over even minor assets, making sure in each case that they are getting their fair share.

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

It is exceptionally rare for a divorce settlement, once finalized, to be thrown out. But that’s exactly what happened in the case of Terrence Howard, who convinced a California superior court judge to toss the settlement reached with Howard’s second wife Michelle Ghent. That divorce was signed and finalized in 2012, making the decision all the more remarkable for reopening a divorce long since closed.

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get the judge to order my spouse to pay my attorney’s fees in a property division case?”

 

Twenty-five year marriage? Try a twenty-five year divorce.

USSE Charlotte Mecklenburg Divorce Attorney North Carolina Family Alimony LawyerWall Street billionaire Steve Cohen is fending off claims from his Manhattan book editor ex-wife, Patricia, who sued the former SAC Capital Advisors, LP honcho in 2009, alleging he misled her about a supposedly failing real estate deal and cheated her out of $2.75 million.

The Cohens married in 1979, but the stress of Mr. Cohen’s Wall Street job put the marriage on the rocks. The couple divorced in 1990, when—according to Bloomberg News—Mr. Cohen was “barely worth eight figures.”

He is worth much more now. Since Mrs. Cohen filed her suit in 2009, Mr. Cohen’s net worth has doubled to an estimated $11.1 billion.

Aside from his ex-wife, Mr. Cohen and his company—now called Point72 Asset Management LP—have spent six years fending off insider-trading charges and corruption investigations. In 2013, Manhattan United States Attorney Preet Bharara called Cohen’s company a “magnet for market cheaters.”

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

 

Best-selling author Honoree Corder had what she described as “the great pleasure” of interviewing a slew of divorce attorneys for her new book, If Divorce is a Game, These are the Rules. On Friday, she posted an article on the Huffington Post titled “3 Things Your Divorce Lawyer Isn’t Telling You.”

Overwhelmed Charlotte Mecklenburg Divorce Lawyer North Carolina Child Custody AttorneyIf you, the client, will just focus on these three things, Ms. Corder writes, you and everyone involved in your divorce “will have a more positive and effortless divorce experience.” Failing to undertake these actions will, according to Ms. Corder, make life—and your divorce—tough.

Ms. Corder encourages people contemplating or going through a divorce to prioritize paying their divorce attorney the same way they prioritize paying other bills in their lives. Attorneys with whom Ms. Corder spoke said they feel like some clients—often high-maintenance clients who question and challenge nearly everything—fail to pay their legal bills in a timely manner because they compartmentalize their lives.

On the one hand, people live their “real lives” where they have to keep up with real-life bills or else suffer consequences such as having their power or water cut off or being removed from their homes. On the other hand, people live their “divorce life,” a life in which they act irrationally, “demand unreasonable outcomes,” fail to pay their bills and yet expect their attorneys to keep moving their case along.

As Ms. Corder puts it, nice clients who pay their bills have a much easier time in the divorce process.

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Charlotte Divorce Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “When do you get alimony?”

 

Stay-at-home moms are facing a tougher road in divorce courts, as judges and state legislatures move to limit the both the amount of support payments and the period of time during which payments can be doled out.

Alimony Movie Poster Mecklenburg Divorce Lawyer North Carolina Child Custody AttorneyNew York City divorce attorney Morghan Richardson said judges are beginning to view women as having the same opportunities to earn a living as men. This thinking applies to stay-at-home moms—even those who may not have worked in a decade or two.

Just three-percent of persons receiving alimony in 2010 were men. While women made up the vast majority of those receiving alimony, they also outstripped men in many college and professional degrees, in some careers and, in some instances, in compensation.

With three-fourths of women now in the workforce and almost half of families led by a woman wage-earner, more and more attorneys and litigants are seeing homemakers seeking alimony admonished by judges who believe their decision not to seek employment was foolhardy.

Richardson said some stay-at-home moms “sometimes have a real sense of entitlement about the decision to stay home.” She said divorce judges, however, have little sympathy for women who quit their jobs to stay at home and raise a family. Some of those judges, Richardson said, are women who had to put their own children in daycare to work their way up to the bench.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get the judge to order my spouse to pay my attorney’s fees in a property division case?”

 

A divorce litigant and her lawyers are learning the hard way that when a case is over, it’s over.

“I’ll get the best lawyer!” Wife Josephine faints after husband Napoleon tells her he is filing for divorce.

“I’ll get the best lawyer!” Wife Josephine faints after husband Napoleon tells her he is filing for divorce.

The litigant, Jamie McCourt, didn’t think the tax-free $131 million and bevy of luxury homes she received in her 2012 divorce settlement agreement with ex-husband Frank McCourt was enough. She asked a court to set aside the agreement, arguing that her ex-husband undervalued baseball team the Los Angeles Dodgers before selling it for over $2 billion to a consortium that included ex-NBA great Magic Johnson.

Jamie McCourt alleged she was entitled to another $770 million.

Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon rejected Mrs. McCourt’s claims. He wrote that Mrs. McCourt was a “sophisticated individual” who was assisted by a team of lawyers and accountants during her divorce. The language of the settlement agreement made it clear that the McCourts intended to end their divorce case and that the terms of the agreement “were carefully considered and negotiated.”

The agreement also provided that if either side contested the settlement agreement, the contesting party would have to pay the other side’s attorney’s fees. Judge Gordon cited that provision of the agreement in a ruling entered July 1. He ordered Mrs. McCourt to reimburse Mr. McCourt’s lawyers $1.9 million in legal fees. That’s how much Mr. McCourt spent fighting Mrs. McCourt’s challenge to the divorce settlement agreement.

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