Articles Tagged with Law Firm

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold being interviewed on the Legal Forum. This was recorded in Charlotte, North Carolina.

It’s a question that few people think about until it’s too late: what happens if your electronic privacy is compromised? There are a lot of reasons for this. Some people think they just aren’t interesting enough to worry as they don’t have dirt worth digging up. Others (mistakenly) believe their password will serve as a fortress, shielding their secrets forever. For others, it never even crosses their mind that a significant other would try to do something like invade their privacy. The reality is that, in some sad cases, individuals learn the hard truth that privacy, especially online, is incredibly hard to maintain.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How are military divorces different from a regular divorce?”

It’s rare that spousal support cases make their way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices are usually grappling with weighty issues involving constitutional rights, but occasionally make time for less headline-grabbing matters. Recently, that’s exactly what the Court did, hearing and then deciding a small case with an even smaller amount of money on the line. Though the ruling won’t go down in history, it does clarify an area of confusion in the law and will bring certainty to a number of other military divorces.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is the amount of child support decided in North Carolina?”

Family law is an aspect of our legal system that can sometimes seem immune to change. It can take years for the family law world to react to changes in society, and even longer for those changes to trickle down through the various states. One state that hasn’t changed its family laws in decades is Illinois. Legislators there have decided to finally tackle the outdated legal code and are in the midst of a multi-year overhaul.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What are my custody rights if the other parent moves?”

Though it’s gone smoothly in some places, other courts in more conservative states have had a bumpy road adapting to changed legal realities since the landmark same-sex marriage case decided by the Supreme Court in 2015. A good example of this is in Tennessee, where one same-sex couple has spent months and months fighting to get a divorce, something that has proven harder than many expected.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How is the amount of child support decided in North Carolina?”

Most people know that it’s important to have health insurance. Same thing with car insurance or life insurance or homeowner’s insurance or renter’s insurance. We rely on insurance, in all its many forms, to protect us when things go badly and we encounter some financial setbacks that we aren’t able to cover on our own. It’s based on this premise that an insurance company recently announced it would begin offering divorce insurance, adding to the long list of insurance that a person could consider paying for.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How should I prepare if I intend to file for divorce in the near future?”

One of the most contentious issues in a divorce involves dividing a couple’s assets. As the process almost always reveals, people put a lot of stock in their possessions and often view the division, who gets what, as a kind of judgment of their contribution to the relationship. This is why in some cases it matters a great deal to one party whether they walk away with 45, 50 or 55 percent. Though the amount itself may not matter, the idea that their contribution has been appropriately acknowledged does.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

People often discuss how when divorce happens, children can wind up caught in the middle. It’s true, children are sometimes used as pawns, with one parent attempting to deprive the other of time with the kids as a way of exacting revenge. Parents caught in a terrible struggle can lose sight of the best interests of the children, letting their own hurt feelings cloud their better judgment.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “When do you get alimony?”

A recent article in the Chicago Tribune discussed the sad case of the divorce of the founder of the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. He and his wife have been embroiled in a dispute for more than eight years now and continue to fight about what share of the marital estate his wife is entitled to. The woman is asking for more than $400,000 a month in spousal maintenance, an astronomical sum to most people. One of her arguments supporting such a figure is the idea that taxes take a big bite out of what she’s already received and she needs more to comfortably pay her bills.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are covered by child support?”

MarketWatch shared a reader query this week from a man named Marc who wanted to know if he could sue his “deadbeat dad” for the decades of unpaid child support his father owed him and his mother. Marc’s father, from whom he has been estranged for the last 15 years, owes child support debt dating all the way back to 1956.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

It’s just passed the one-year anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling in the landmark Obergefell case. In that case, the Court announced that same-sex marriage bans were unconstitutional, forcing courts around the country to begin allowing same-sex marriages. Today, the courts are still grappling with how to do that, especially given confusing and sometimes contradictory state legislation.