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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

The New York Court of Appeals (the state’s highest court) will grapple with a tricky legal question that has become increasingly important in the family law world: what is a parent? The answer to the question will impact hundreds if not thousands of custody disputes involving same-sex parents who for years have waged battle without the kind of legal clarity that exists in cases involving opposite sex partners.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are not covered by child support?”

When he divorced his ex-wife Nicoletta Zuin in 2002, Nicola Toso agreed to pay child support for their daughter, who was then six (6) years old. He paid 300 euros, about $335, a month without an issue for years.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Does adultery affect my divorce case?”

If you pay off your neutral custody arbitrator, allegedly manipulate police into investigating your ex-wife’s new beau, and try to get your ex-wife kicked out of the Catholic Church but still don’t get the custody arrangement you want…sue your ex for $10 million for manipulating you? This seems to be Bill O’Reilly’s train of thought as of late.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to get a Divorce in North Carolina?”

Insurance may not be one of the first things that crosses your mind if you’re in the midst of or recently emerging from a North Carolina divorce. Though insurance may not seem pressing, the reality is that it can prove quite important given that emergencies seldom come with advance warning. To ensure that you are fully protected and insurance proceeds go where you intend them to go, spend some time after your divorce making sure to get your insurance affairs in order. For ideas on what to watch out for, keep reading.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: ” I’m considering separating from my spouse; what actions should I refrain from doing?”

Prior to and during the 1970s, the so-called “Mexican divorce” was having something of a moment. Fed up with the lengthy and expensive divorce process in the United States, couples from the States would pop across the border for a quickie divorce proceeding, without the lengthy waiting periods required in many states. Mexico wasn’t the only country host to many a drive-through divorce proceeding; they became popular in a host of Central American countries, particularly the Dominican Republic, as well as the Caribbean islands.

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Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How Can I protect myself from my spouses spending habits?”

If you’re preparing for a North Carolina divorce, you likely know to take your house, cars, bank accounts and retirement funds into consideration before dividing assets. These are the kinds of things that everyone thinks about when they think of property. They’re tangible and easy to identify. While it’s crucial that these easier items be accounted for, it’s just as important to remember those more complicated bits of property, including intellectual property, as they can end up being very valuable down the road and can provide important income to fund your future.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What children’s expenses are covered by child support?”

In a case that is the first of its kind for our courts, the North Carolina Court of Appeals just ruled that a child support order can include private school tuition for families whose gross income exceeds the state’s Child Support Guidelines.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “How does custody work if one parent moves internationally?”

A common complaint from those currently going through or recently emerging from a North Carolina divorce is that the whole process simply takes too long. Meeting with lawyers, filing the necessary documents, dealing with custody, agreeing to a settlement and getting everything finalized can take time, sometimes a long time. The problem of a slow divorce process is apparently not unique to the United States, as French citizens have complained and lawmakers are considering taking action to speed the process along.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can I do to gain custody of my child in North Carolina?”

A recent article discussed the trend among some couples, celebrity and otherwise, to consider new approaches to co-parenting post-divorce. One such trend, known as “birdnesting”, has been around for years, but appears to be enjoying particular popularity at the moment. Gwyneth Paltrow and her ex-husband Chris Martin do a version of birdnesting, while Anne Dudek, from “Mad Men”, and her ex publicly announced that they would pursue a birdnesting arrangement once their split is final.

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Board Certified Family Law Specialist Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does a “No-Fault’ divorce mean in NC?”

The attorney-client privilege can be an almost sacred right for either party in a divorce proceeding. Knowing that the private communications you have with your attorney about your case stay sacrosanct fosters candor and peace of mind in the relationship you have with the person representing you on such a personal case.  This in turn allows your attorney to better prepare for your case. Similarly, the work product privilege protects materials prepared in preparation for litigation. These two immunities protect information from being produced (through documentation or testimony) via discovery from the opposing side. In any given divorce or family law case there can be facts, confidences and strategies that you do not want shared with your (soon-to-be former) spouse’s side and argued against you in court.